Nav: Home

Olfactory receptors: New molecular targets detected in colorectal cancer cells

March 23, 2017

Growth of colorectal cancer cells can be inhibited with the odorant troenan. This is reported by the research team headed by Prof Dr Dr Dr habil. Hanns Hatt and Dr Lea Weber from Ruhr-Universität Bochum in the journal PLOS ONE. The researchers detected the olfactory receptor OR51B4 in tumour cells taken from the rectum and colon cancer cell lines. They analysed which odorant activates the receptor and in what way the activation affects the cells.

For the purpose of the study, the team from the Department for Cellphysiology in Bochum collaborated with the Department of Molecular GI-Oncology at Ruhr-Universität, headed by Prof Dr Stephan Hahn. The necessary gene sequencing was carried out by the team from the Cologne Center for Genomics.

Floral scent activates receptor

Olfactory receptors had been demonstrated in various healthy as well as cancerous tissues. The Bochum-based researchers have now detected the OR51B4 receptor (upregulated) in colorectal cancer cells. They identified the molecule troenan as activator of OR51B4. It smells of privet, a flowering shrub that is often cultivated in hedges.

In the next step, the researchers treated cancerous cells of the HCT116 cell line and tumour tissue samples with troenan. The result: cell proliferation was slowed down and the cells moved more slowly than previously - an inhibition of tumour growth and metastasis. Moreover, troenan treatment resulted in an increase in apoptosis of cancerous cells. In follow-up experiments with nude mice, which grew the human tumour, the scent effect has been confirmed.

Potential therapy approach

Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer form in Germany, occurring in more than six per cent of all Germans. The material utilised in the current study were colorectal tumours, which amount to 95 per cent of malign rectal tumours and constitute the most frequent cause of death in colorectal cancer patients. After surgical removal of such tumours, patients have a chance of recovery of 50 per cent. The decisive factor is the stage of the disease in which colorectal cancer is detected. Specific pharmacological treatment is, as yet, not available; only general chemotherapy.

"We assume that our results might pave the way for a new approach for colorectal cancer therapy," says Hanns Hatt. The tumours can often be accessed from the inner cavity of the intestine. "It is therefore conceivable that oral or rectal administration might transport the scent troenan in effective concentrations directly to the tumour. To this end, it will be necessary to conduct clinical studies with patients," continues Hatt.
-end-


Ruhr-University Bochum

Related Colorectal Cancer Articles:

New method for early screening of colorectal cancer
A highly sensitive method that can detect even the earlier stages of colorectal cancer has been developed by researchers in Japan.
Adults with disabilities screened less often for colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in the United States, with nearly 135,000 cases reported in 2016.
Colorectal cancer statistics, 2017
Despite dramatic reductions in overall colorectal cancer incidence and mortality, striking disparities by age, race, and tumor subsite remain
Gene mutations among young patients with colorectal cancer
While many patients with colorectal are diagnosed when they are older than 50, about 10 percent of patients are diagnosed at younger ages.
Metabolite that promotes cancer cell transformation and colorectal cancer spread identified
Osaka University researchers revealed that the metabolite D-2-hydroxyglurate (D-2HG) promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells, leading them to develop features of lower adherence to neighboring cells, increased invasiveness, and greater likelihood of metastatic spread.
New immunotherapy study at Sanford centers on colorectal cancer
Sanford Health has opened another clinical trial exploring the power of the body's immune system to fight cancer.
UA Cancer Center team questions safety, efficacy of selenium and colorectal cancer risk
Selenium has been a popular nutritional supplement for decades, touted for its antioxidant properties and its role in stopping free radicals from damaging cells and DNA.
How mouth microbes may worsen colorectal cancer
Bacteria commonly found in the mouth have been recently shown to worsen colorectal cancer in animals, but it has not been clear how these microbes make their way to the gut in the first place.
Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy may eliminate colorectal cancer
An emerging cancer therapy has colorectal tumors surrounded. Presenters at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging are unveiling a novel radioimmunotherapy that combines a cancer-seeking antibody with potent radionuclide agents, resulting in complete remission of colorectal cancer in mouse models.
As colorectal cancer rate falls, diagnosis of late-stage cancer in young patients is up
University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2016 finds that in patients over 50, the rate of CRC is falling at 2.5 percent per year while the rate of CRC in patients under 50 is rising at 0.8 percent per year.

Related Colorectal Cancer Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...