Nav: Home

Overcoming workplace barriers to breastfeeding -- review and recommendations in The Nurse Practitioner

March 23, 2017

March 23, 2017 -For mothers of new infants, going back to work may pose a number of obstacles to continued breastfeeding. Workplace policies affecting the ability to breastfeed--and the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) in helping to overcome those obstacles -- are the topic of a special article in The Nurse Practitioner, published by Wolters Kluwer.

"Breastfeeding yields many important benefits to both mother and infants, yet workplace barriers contribute to low rates of breastfeeding," according to the article by Rhonda Winegar, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, CPN, CCRN, and Alisha Johnson, MSN, RN. "Nurse practitioners often serve as the initial point of education for new mothers and may impact decisions to breastfeed."

Workplace Policies May Make It Harder for Women to Continue Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is widely recommended as the best nutrition for infants, providing health benefits for babies and mothers alike. As such, measures to encourage breastfeeding have the potential to lower healthcare costs. "Society in general benefits from mothers and infants who are healthier," according to the authors.

But while 75 percent of women choose breastfeeding after delivery, only 40 percent will continue breastfeeding after they return to work. "In the United States, breastfeeding is considered a personal choice, and legislation in support of breastfeeding in the workplace is more limited than in most other countries," Rhonda Winegar and Alisha Johnson write.

Employer policies can have a major impact on women's ability to continue breastfeeding after returning to work. One study found that women who work at companies with policies to support breastfeeding are more likely to continue breastfeeding for at least six months, as recommended by current guidelines.

The article identifies key elements of a successful workplace breastfeeding policy include providing appropriate breaks and a suitable area for women to pump breast milk, as well as a storage facility for the expressed milk (such as a refrigerator), if requested. The costs of such policies are relatively low--and are likely to be offset by the potential savings from fewer employee absences, lower healthcare costs, and less employee turnover.

And yet, employers may be unlikely to adopt breastfeeding promotion programs unless there are regulations to support them. The 'Break Time for Nursing Mothers' provision of the Affordable Care Act includes protections covering some employees and workplaces. In addition, 28 states (along with Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia) have laws in place regarding breastfeeding in the workplace. "Nurse practitioners should stay current on current legislation and community resources that are available to support breastfeeding once these patients return to work," the authors write.

Other steps to promote continued breastfeeding range from prescribing an electric breast pump or arranging for a lactation consultant, to dealing with common concerns such as milk leakage on work clothes. Rhonda Winegar and Alisha Johnson conclude, "NPs can positively influence the incidence of breastfeeding and ultimately improve the health of society in general."

The article appears as part of a special Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) theme issue of The Nurse Practitioner. In a video podcast, Rhonda Winegar discusses the personal experiences that led to her advocacy for policies to support breastfeeding in the workplace, and inspired her to become a DNP.
-end-
Click here to read "Do workplace policies influence a woman's decision to breastfeed?"

Article: "Do workplace policies influence a woman's decision to breastfeed?" (doi: 10.1097/01.NPR.0000513338.92438.65)

About The Nurse Practitioner

With a circulation of 75,000, The Nurse Practitioner is the leading monthly source for clinical, practical, cutting-edge information for advanced practice nurses and other primary care clinicians. Each issue presents peer-reviewed articles that range from clinical topics and research to political and practice issues. In addition, The Nurse Practitioner provides regular features, columns, continuing education, staff development education, and more.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer N.V. (AEX: WKL) is a global leader in information services and solutions for professionals in the health, tax and accounting, risk and compliance, finance and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2016 annual revenues of €4.3 billion. The company, headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands, serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries and employs 19,000 people worldwide.

Wolters Kluwer shares are listed on Euronext Amsterdam (WKL) and are included in the AEX and Euronext 100 indices. Wolters Kluwer has a sponsored Level 1 American Depositary Receipt program. The ADRs are traded on the over-the-counter market in the U.S. (WTKWY).

For more information about our solutions and organization, visit http://www.wolterskluwer.com, follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube.

Wolters Kluwer Health

Related Breastfeeding Articles:

What causes women to stop breastfeeding early?
A recent systematic literature review has investigated potential sociodemographic, physical, mental, and social factors that may cause breastfeeding mothers to stop breastfeeding before infants reach 6 months of age.
Breastfeeding may protect against chronic pain after Caesarean section
Breastfeeding after a Caesarean section (C-section) may help manage pain, with mothers who breastfed their babies for at least two months after the operation three times less likely to experience persistent pain compared to those who breastfed for less than two months, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress in Geneva (June 3-5).
Can breastfeeding reduce a woman's risk of metabolic syndrome?
A new study shows that women who spend a longer time breastfeeding during their lifetimes may be able to lower their risk of metabolic syndrome and related disorders included elevated blood pressure, glucose, and triglyceride levels.
Post-breastfeeding tissue remodeling explained by new research
A groundbreaking study into the changes that occur in a woman's breast, from growing into one that provides milk for a newborn, and then back to its normal state, has discovered that milk-producing cells are, in effect, cannibalized by other cells following the period of breastfeeding.
Breastfeeding associated with better brain development and neurocognitive outcomes
A new study, which followed 180 pre-term infants from birth to age seven, found that babies who were fed more breast milk within the first 28 days of life had had larger volumes of certain regions of the brain at term equivalent and had better IQs, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function.
Breastfeeding gaps between white, black, and Hispanic mothers in the US
Chapman University has published research on how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers.
Breastfeeding, antibiotics before weaning and BMI in later childhood
Breastfeeding in children who had received no antibiotics before weaning was associated with a decreased number of antibiotic courses after weaning and a decreased body mass index (BMI) later in childhood, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.
Breastfeeding is good for yet another reason, researchers discover
A mother's breast milk supports immune responses in her newborn that help the infant's gut become a healthy home to a mix of bacterial species, thanks in part to newly identified antibodies from the mother, according to a study by UC Berkeley researchers.
Victims of violence stop breastfeeding sooner
One in four women who have been victims of violence as adults are at risk of stopping breastfeeding before their baby is four months old.
Children breastfeeding after first birthday should take vitamin D supplements, study says
Children who are breastfeeding after their first birthday should take a vitamin D supplement to prevent health problems such as rickets, new research suggests.

Related Breastfeeding Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...