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Can soap really 'kill' the coronavirus? (video)

March 23, 2020

WASHINGTON, March 23, 2020 -- Constantly being told to wash your hands? Us, too. So we're diving into the chemistry behind why soap is so effective against viruses like the coronavirus that causes COVID-19: https://youtu.be/K2pMVimI2bw.
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