Nav: Home

Chatty kids do better at school

March 23, 2020

Young children go on to achieve more academic success when their verbal skills are enhanced, a new study suggests.

The study, by researchers at the University of York, looked at why children from wealthier and well-educated family backgrounds tend to do better at school.

The researchers found that children from families of higher socioeconomic status had better language abilities at nursery school age and that these verbal skills boosted their later academic performance throughout school.

The researchers looked at data from nearly 700 British children. The children's pre-school ability was tested at four years-old and their educational outcomes were tracked throughout school up until the age of 16.

Differences in language skills between children explained around 50% of the effect of family background on children's achievement in the first year of school. This achievement gap widened over the course of their education, the study suggests.

Lead author of the study, Professor Sophie von Stumm from the Department of Education said: "Our findings show that a child's learning at home when they are under five is really important to their chances of later academic success.

"Children from more advantaged backgrounds are more familiar before starting school with the language patterns and linguistic codes that are used in formal educational settings and are expected by teachers.

"Not all children get the same start in life, but this study highlights the importance of helping parents of all backgrounds to engage with their children in activities which enhance verbal skills - such as reading bedtime stories and engaging the child in conversations.

"Activities designed to improve verbal skills boost cognitive, social and emotional development, in addition to benefitting parent-child bonding."

The research is the first major study to look at children's abilities in their early years and the extent to which it explains their later educational achievement.

The researchers also looked at non-verbal ability at nursey school age and found that it had a smaller, but never-the-less significant role in explaining the link between background inequalities and academic success.

Children from high socioeconomic backgrounds were at an advantage when it came to their non-verbal skills - such as solving puzzles, drawing shapes and copying actions - before they started school.

These skills were found to account for around a third of the link between family background and later educational achievement.

Preschool verbal and nonverbal ability mediate the association between socioeconomic status and school performance is published in Child Development.
-end-


University of York

Related Socioeconomic Status Articles:

'Low' socioeconomic status is the biggest barrier to STEM participation
A new study has found that socioeconomic status (SES) has the strongest impact on whether secondary school students study the STEM sciences.
Socioeconomic inequalities are decisive in the health of the elderly
Researchers at the UPV/EHU, Osakidetza and the Department of Health have reviewed scientific papers that analyse the relationship between socioeconomic inequalities and health among the elderly population in Spain.
Cooperation with high status individuals may increase one's own status
While other animals tend to gain status through aggression, humans are typically averse to allowing such dominant individuals to achieve high status.
Massachusetts General study identifies pathway linking socioeconomic status to cardiovascular risk
A biological pathway previously found to contribute to the impact of stress on the risk of cardiovascular disease also may underlie the increased incidence of such disease experienced by individuals with lower socioeconomic status.
How can organizations promote and benefit from socioeconomic diversity?
A new white paper has been published by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.
Socioeconomic status associated with likelihood of receiving a heart pump
Racial/ethnic minorities, patients who are uninsured or only have Medicaid insurance and those living in low-income ZIP codes were less likely to receive a heart pumping device known as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD).
Blacks with high socioeconomic status less likely to seek mental health care
In her latest research paper Sirry Alang questions why there is a significant unmet need for mental health care among Blacks and identifies solutions among healthcare systems to fix it: teach the history of racism in medicine; and actively seek, privilege and legitimize the narratives of black people.
Salad, soda and socioeconomic status: Mapping a social determinant of health in Seattle
Seattle residents who live in waterfront neighborhoods tend to have healthier diets compared to those who live along Interstate-5 and Aurora Avenue, according to new research on social disparities from the University of Washington School of Public Health.
How socioeconomic status shapes developing brains
The relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and brain anatomy is mostly stable from childhood to early adulthood, according to a longitudinal neuroimaging study of more than 600 healthy young people published in JNeurosci.
Socioeconomic status may explain racial & ethnic disparities in childhood cancer survival
A new study provides insights into the degree to which socioeconomic status explains racial and ethnic disparities in childhood cancer survival.
More Socioeconomic Status News and Socioeconomic Status Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.