National Academies advisory: April 6 symposium celebrating the International Polar Year

March 24, 2009

The National Academy of Sciences and the National Science Foundation will co-host a symposium that highlights the early accomplishments of International Polar Year -- the global research effort to better understand the polar regions. With more than 200 scientific expeditions and a thousand research projects to discuss, the speakers will focus their talks on climate change, polar ice sheet stability and sea level, polar ecosystems, and people in the changing Arctic.

DETAILS:

Monday, April 6, from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the National Academy of Sciences building, 2100 C St., N.W., Washington, D.C. Those who cannot attend may watch a live video webcast of the event at http://national-academies.org. The event is free and open to the public. Registration required. The agenda and registrations are available online at http://www.dels.nas.edu/prb/.

Reporters who wish to attend must register in advance with the National Academies' Office of News and Public Information, tel. 202-334-2138 or e-mail news@nas.edu.

SPEAKERS:
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National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

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