Nav: Home

From gold mines to sand hills

March 24, 2016

Boulder, Colorado, USA - Geoscientists from the southeastern United States and beyond will convene in Columbia, South Carolina, USA, on 31 March-1 April to discuss new science, expand on existing science, and explore the unique geologic features of the region. Topics at this 65th Annual SE Section Meeting include coastal geology, environmental education, fossils, earthquake hazards, and gold exploration.

The University of South Carolina's Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, and College of Arts and Sciences are meeting sponsors.

Field Trips

A pre-meeting field trip will depart 30 March to explore the Haile Gold Mine. Post-meeting trips will visit Congaree National Park, Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge, and Arc Terranes of the eastern Piedmont. http://www.geosociety.org/Sections/se/2016mtg/fieldTrips.htmSelected Highlights of the Scientific Program

The scientific program is composed of oral and poster presentations organized into one symposium and 23 themed sessions covering an array of geoscience disciplines. http://www.geosociety.org/Sections/se/2016mtg/techprog.htm

THURSDAY, 31 MARCH

Surface Water, Groundwater, and Biogeochemical Processes in the Coastal Zone

These Thursday afternoon talks will examine several health and safety issues around water systems affecting human and wildlife populations.

Presentations: https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2016SE/webprogram/Session39049.htmlLead author Bryant Mountjoy (bryantm656@gmail.com), Western Carolina University, looks at the concentrations of lead from bullets from an outdoor shooting range in sediment, groundwater, and surface water, compared to natural background levels, in order to provide information regarding preventative measures against lead contamination.

FRIDAY, 1 APRIL

Extreme rainfall effects in South Carolina, October 2015

These Friday afternoon talks promise greater clarity about the second largest disaster in South Carolina since hurricane Hugo in 1989.

Presentations: https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2016SE/webprogram/Session39453.htmlLead Author Charlie Kaufman, South Carolina Emergency Management Division (SCEMD) (ckaufman@emd.sc.gov), will examine impacts of the "rain bomb" that dropped more than 24 inches in ~36 hours in some areas of the state, from the perspective of SCEMD operations. Analysis includes GIS maps of total rainfall, known water and flooding locations and depths, and dam and road failures, which have been combined with demographic and economic information to better understand the current and projected costs for the state of South Carolina to fully recover from this historical flooding event.

View the complete session schedule by day or search the program by keywords at https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2016SE/webprogram/start.html. Click on session titles for a list of presentations, and click on presentations for the individual abstracts.

Find complete meeting information at http://www.geosociety.org/Sections/se/2016mtg/index.htm .

Find local contact information at http://www.geosociety.org/Sections/se/2016mtg/contact.htm.

MEDIA REGISTRATION

Eligibility for media registration is as follows:
  • Working press representing bona fide, recognized news media with a press card, letter or business card from the publication.
  • Freelance science writers, presenting a current membership card from NASW, ISWA, regional affiliates of NASW, ISWA, CSWA, ACS, ABSW, EUSJA, or evidence of work pertaining to science published in 2015 or 2016.
  • PIOs of scientific societies, educational institutions, and government agencies.
Present media credentials to William Cox onsite at the GSA registration desk to obtain a badge for media access. Complimentary meeting registration covers attendance at all technical sessions and access to the exhibit hall. Journalists and PIOs must pay regular fees for paid luncheons and any short courses or field trips in which they participate. Representatives of the business side of news media, publishing houses, and for-profit corporations must register at the main registration desk and pay the appropriate fees.
-end-
For additional information and assistance, contact Christa Stratton, GSA Director of Communications, at the address above.

http://www.geosociety.org

The Geological Society of America, founded in 1888, is a scientific society with more than 26,000 members from academia, government, and industry in more than 100 countries. Through its meetings, publications, and programs, GSA enhances the professional growth of its members and promotes the geosciences in the service of humankind. Headquartered in Boulder, Colorado, GSA encourages cooperative research among earth, life, planetary, and social scientists, fosters public dialogue on geoscience issues, and supports all levels of earth science education.

Geological Society of America

Related Groundwater Articles:

West Virginia groundwater not affected by fracking, but surface water is
Three years of fracking has not contaminated groundwater in northwestern West Virginia, but accidental spills of wastewater from fracked wells may pose a threat to surface water, according to a study led by scientists at Duke University.
11 percent of disappearing groundwater used to grow internationally traded food
11 percent of the global non-renewable groundwater drawn up for irrigation goes to produce crops that are then traded on the international market.
As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundation
New research from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa reveals a large part of the heavily urbanized area of Honolulu and Waikiki, Hawai'i is at risk of groundwater inundation--flooding that occurs as groundwater is lifted above the ground surface due to sea level rise.
Calculating recharge of groundwater more precisely
An international team of researchers has demonstrated that key processes in models used for the global assessment of water resources for climate change are currently missing.
Calculating recharge of groundwater more precisely
Researchers demonstrate that current models underestimate role of subsurface heterogeneity.
Deep groundwater aquifers respond rapidly to climate variability
Changes in climate can rapidly impact even the deepest freshwater aquifers according to Penn State and Columbia University hydrologists.
Anthropogenic groundwater extraction impacts climate
Anthropogenic groundwater exploitation changes soil moisture and land-atmosphere water and energy fluxes, and essentially affects the ecohydrological processes and the climate system.
Groundwater helium level could signal potential risk of earthquake
Japanese researchers have revealed a relationship between helium levels in groundwater and the amount of stress exerted on inner rock layers of the earth, found at locations near the epicenter of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake.
Study links groundwater changes to fracking
A new study has found heightened concentrations of some common substances in drinking water near sites where hydraulic fracturing has taken place.
Colorado River Delta flows help birds, plants, groundwater
Two growing seasons after the engineered spring flood of the Colorado River Delta in 2014, the delta's birds, plants and groundwater continue to benefit, according to the latest monitoring report prepared for the International Boundary and Water Commission by a binational University of Arizona-led team.

Related Groundwater Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...