Nav: Home

Youth smoking and vaping: What does it mean for tobacco control

March 24, 2019

Because most people who smoke cigarettes begin young, public health efforts to prevent tobacco use among youth are a priority.

The increasing popularity of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) or e-cigarettes, also called personal vaporizers, vape pens, e-cigars, e-hookah, vaping devices, mod systems or pod systems, raises concerns about normalizing cigarette smoking and perpetuating nicotine addiction. This can create dual users who both vape and smoke.

New research led by the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation features analysis of in-depth, qualitative interviews with young vapers in California between 15 and 25 years of age.

The interviews focused on:
  • youth's experiences and reasons for ENDS initiation and use

  • initiation pathways by self-reported use and age of initiation of ENDS and cigarettes including smoking to vaping, vaping to smoking, and vaping only

  • the meanings young people ascribe to their dual use practices and how those meanings relate to the tobacco control environment.

Results show that the most common pathway of use reported by participants was smoking to vaping (74%) followed by vaping prior to smoking, and then vaping but never smoking.

The results also show that, regardless of initiation pathway, youth were generally aware of the health consequences of smoking and engaged in use of nicotine products after considering the risks. They perceive the use of ENDS as a way to avoid smoking.

Said one 20-year old participant who had been smoking since she was 15:

[Vaping] was a little bit of a conscious decision. I wanted to lower the amount of nicotine I was getting daily. I tried [to quit smoking] cold turkey before. I couldn't do it. It was just way too hard...So...I tried the e-cigarettes and the vapes. And I was 'well, this isn't that bad'. It was more customizable...flavors and you can control the nicotine levels. So 'okay, I like this'... I mostly kind of sort of moved away from the traditional cigarettes. Like I still buy a pack every now and then, but I don't go through them as fast as I used to...I still get the craving, but I'm more likely to reach for my vape versus a cigarette.

The study highlights the need for public health professionals to acknowledge harm reduction strategies of youth users of ENDS as public health messages are constructed and as policies for smoking cessation are crafted.

Says lead author, Dr. Tamar Antin, "I think we, as public health professionals, need to take a step back to consider whether our approaches to e-cigarettes have been shaped in way that will ultimately benefit the health of all young people."
-end-
Source #1: Antin, T.M., Hunt, G., Kaner, E. and Lipperman-Kreda, S., 2019. Youth perspectives on concurrent smoking and vaping: Implications for tobacco control. International Journal of Drug Policy, 66, pp.57-63.

Source #2: Antin, T., Hess, C., Kaner, E., Annechino, R. and Hunt, G., 2019. Pathways of Nicotine Product Use: A Qualitative study of Youth and Young adults in California. Nicotine & Tobacco Research. DOI: 10.1093/ntr/ntz028.

PIRE is an independent, nonprofit organization merging scientific knowledge and proven practice to create solutions that improve the health, safety and well-being of individuals, communities, and nations around the world. http://www.pire.org

The Prevention Research Center (PRC) of PIRE is one of 16 centers sponsored by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), of the National Institutes of Health, and is the only one that specializes in prevention. PRC's focus is on conducting research to better understand the social and physical environments that influence individual behavior that lead to alcohol and drug misuse. http://www.prev.org

The Resource Link for Community Action provides information and practical guidance to state and community agencies and organizations, policy makers, and members of the public who are interested in combating alcohol and other drug abuse and misuse. https://resources.prev.org/

Facebook: facebook.com/PrevResources

Twitter: twitter.com/PrevResources

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/PrevResources

If you would like more information about this topic, please call Sue Thomas at 831.429.4084 or email her at thomas.pire.org

Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation

Related Smoking Articles:

Smoking rates falling in adults, but stroke survivors' smoking rates remain steady
While the rate of Americans who smoke tobacco has fallen steadily over the last two decades, the rate of stroke survivors who smoke has not changed significantly.
What is your risk from smoking? Your network knows!
A new study from researchers at Penn's Annenberg School for Communication found that most people, smokers and non-smokers alike, were nowhere near accurate in their answers to questions about smoking's health effects.
Want to quit smoking? Partner up
Kicking the habit works best in pairs. That's the main message of a study presented today at EuroPrevent 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
Smoking and mortality in Asia
In this analysis of data from 20 studies conducted in China, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan and India with more than 1 million participants, deaths associated with smoking continued to increase among men in Asia grouped by the years in which they were born.
Predictors of successfully quitting smoking among smokers registered at the quit smoking clinic at a public hospital in northeastern Malaysia
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health, Nur Izzati Mohammad et al. consider how cigarette smoking is one of the risk factors leading to noncommunicable diseases such as cardiovascular and respiratory system diseases and cancer.
Restaurant and bar smoking bans do reduce smoking, especially among the highly educated
Smoking risk drops significantly in college graduates when they live near areas that have completely banned smoking in bars and restaurants, according to a new study in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
How the UK smoking ban increased wellbeing
Married women with children reported the largest increase in well-being following the smoking bans in the UK in 2006 and 2007 but there was no comparable increase for married men with children.
Smoking study personalizes treatment
A simple blood test is allowing Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers to determine which patients should be prescribed varenicline (Chantix) to stop smoking and which patients could do just as well, and avoid side effects, by using a nicotine patch.
A biophysical smoking gun
While much about Alzheimer's disease remains a mystery, scientists do know that part of the disease's progression involves a normal protein called tau, aggregating to form ropelike inclusions within brain cells that eventually strangle the neurons.
A case where smoking helped
A mutation in the hemoglobin of a young woman in Germany was found to cause her mild anemia.
More Smoking News and Smoking Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.