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Telemedicine reduces mental health burden of COVID-19

March 24, 2020

New Rochelle, NY, March 23, 2020--"The Role of Telehealth in Reducing the Mental Health Burden from COVID-19" has just been published in the peer-reviewed journal Telemedicine and e-Health. Click here to read the article free on the Telemedicine and e-Health website.

In the article by Xiaoyun Zhou and coauthors, substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of telemental health in the areas of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Factors such as fear of exposure, isolation, loss of income, reduced autonomy, and the absence of a cure for coronavirus infection are contributing to increased stress. The authors emphasize that the provision of mental health support, especially via telehealth, will help patients maintain their psychological well being.

"Telemedicine, which includes teleheath, is growing exponentially at all healthcare institutions, as well as for physicians in groups and in private practice. Healthcare executives are preparing for this," says Mary Ann Liebert, president and CEO of the company that bears her name.
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The Editors of the Journal are available for interviews. Please contact Kathryn Ryan in the publisher's office.

About the Journal

Telemedicine and e-Health is in its 26th year of publication and is an official journal of the American Telemedicine Association, the Canadian Telehealth Forum of COACH, and the International Society for Telemedicine and eHealth. Published monthly online and in print, the Journal covers telemedicine and telehealth applications that are playing an increasingly important role in healthcare and provides tools that are indispensable for home healthcare, remote patient monitoring, and disease management.

The Journal is co-edited by Ronald C. Merrell, M.D., Professor of Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, and Charles R. Doarn, MBA. Complete table of contents and a sample issue may be viewed on the Telemedicine and e-Health website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative medical and biomedical peer-reviewed journals, including Population Health Management, Games for Health Journal, and Journal of Laparoendoscopic Surgery and Advanced Surgical Techniques. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's more than 80 journals, newsmagazines, and books is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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