Nav: Home

Study shows key factors for reducing brain damage from cardiac arrest

March 24, 2020

Osaka, Japan - People who suffer cardiac arrest usually have low likelihood of survival, especially if it happens out of the hospital. Those who do survive can have neurological damage due to the lack of oxygen-rich blood reaching their brain. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can help maintain this blood flow, but it's not always successful. Extracorporeal CPR (ECPR) may be an option, but it can be costly and it's not always clear which patients it will benefit.

Now, Osaka University-led research may have uncovered how to more effectively use ECPR for better outcomes. The researchers reported their findings in the journal, Circulation.

"Standard CPR uses chest compressions to manually stimulate blood flow to vital organs, which can help limit long-term neurological damage," explains Tasuku Matsuyama, the study's lead author. "With ECPR, blood is removed from a vein and oxygenated blood is pumped into an artery. This is a more effective way to maintain tissue function until normal heart rhythms can be restored."

Right now, however, there is little evidence-based guidance on which patients will show the most neurological benefit from ECPR.

The researchers sought this evidence through a multicenter clinical study of people who had suffered out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). In what was called the CRITICAL study, the aim was to understand the factors that predict post-ECPR outcomes.

"We aimed to see whether low-flow duration -- the length of time from when a patient is given standard CPR to when they receive ECPR -- impacts the neurological outcome for OHCA patients," says Taro Irisawa, who led CRITICAL. "We also wanted to understand if there were any differences in ECPR benefit for patients with certain types of heart rhythm that respond to defibrillation."

The researchers prospectively followed 256 OHCA patients at 14 hospitals in Osaka. These patients had initially been given CPR either by bystanders or EMS personnel before receiving ECPR and in-hospital treatment.

The study found that as the time to receiving ECPR decreased, the chance of maintaining brain function went considerably up. Also, when undergoing the same amount of time before receiving ECPR, those who had heart rhythms that responded to defibrillation had much better odds of maintaining brain function than those who did not.

"Our study strongly indicates that reducing the time to ECPR can significantly improve the likelihood of OHCA patients preserving their neurological function, especially those who respond to defibrillation," Irisawa concludes. "We expect that our findings in the CRITICAL study can inform future revisions to international CPR guidelines. This will improve outcomes for these patients."
-end-
The article, "Impact of low-flow duration on favorable neurological outcomes of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A multicenter prospective study" was published in Circulation at DOI: https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.119.044285

About Osaka University

Osaka University was founded in 1931 as one of the seven imperial universities of Japan and now has expanded to one of Japan's leading comprehensive universities. The University has now embarked on open research revolution from a position as Japan's most innovative university and among the most innovative institutions in the world according to Reuters 2015 Top 100 Innovative Universities and the Nature Index Innovation 2017. The university's ability to innovate from the stage of fundamental research through the creation of useful technology with economic impact stems from its broad disciplinary spectrum.

Website: https://resou.osaka-u.ac.jp/en/top

Osaka University

Related Blood Flow Articles:

Blood flow recovers faster than brain in micro strokes
Work by a Rice neurobiologist shows that increased blood flow to the brain is not an accurate indicator of neuronal recovery after a microscopic stroke.
Exercise improves memory, boosts blood flow to brain
Scientists have collected plenty of evidence linking exercise to brain health, with some research suggesting fitness may even improve memory.
3D VR blood flow to improve cardiovascular care
Biomedical engineers are developing a massive fluid dynamics simulator that can model blood flow through the full human arterial system at subcellular resolution.
MRI shows blood flow differs in men and women
Healthy men and women have different blood flow characteristics in their hearts, according to a new study.
Brain blood flow sensor discovery could aid treatments for high blood pressure & dementia
A study led by researchers at UCL has discovered the mechanism that allows the brain to monitor its own blood supply, a finding in rats which may help to find new treatments for human conditions including hypertension (high blood pressure) and dementia.
Blood flow monitor could save lives
A tiny fibre-optic sensor has the potential to save lives in open heart surgery, and even during surgery on pre-term babies.
Changes in blood flow tell heart cells to regenerate
Altered blood flow resulting from heart injury switches on a communication cascade that reprograms heart cells and leads to heart regeneration in zebrafish.
Blood flow command center discovered in the brain
An international team of researchers has discovered a group of cells in the brain that may function as a 'master-controller' for the cardiovascular system, orchestrating the control of blood flow to different parts of the body.
Researchers closer to new Alzheimer's therapy with brain blood flow discovery
By discovering the culprit behind decreased blood flow in the brain of people with Alzheimer's, biomedical engineers at Cornell University have made possible promising new therapies for the disease.
In vitro grafts increase blood flow in infarcted rat hearts
Advances in stem cell research offer hope for treatments that could help patients regrow heart muscle tissue after heart attacks, a key to patients achieving more complete recoveries.
More Blood Flow News and Blood Flow Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Making Amends
What makes a true apology? What does it mean to make amends for past mistakes? This hour, TED speakers explore how repairing the wrongs of the past is the first step toward healing for the future. Guests include historian and preservationist Brent Leggs, law professor Martha Minow, librarian Dawn Wacek, and playwright V (formerly Eve Ensler).
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.