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Is step count associated with lower risk of death?

March 24, 2020

What The Study Did: Researchers looked at whether taking more steps and higher intensity stepping were associated with reduced risk of death in this observational study that included almost 4,900 adults (40 and over) who wore a device called an accelerometer to measure their step count and step intensity (steps/minute).

Authors: Pedro F. Saint-Maurice, Ph.D., of the National Cancer Institute in Rockville, Maryland, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jama.2020.1382)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the articles for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflicts of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.
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Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

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