Call for abstracts and registration for the EMBO Meeting 2009

March 25, 2009

HEIDELBERG, GERMANY, 25 MARCH 2009 - More than 120 researchers will speak at The EMBO Meeting 2009 - the first annual life sciences conference to be organized by the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) and held in Amsterdam from 29 August to 1 September 2009.

The EMBO Meeting 2009 advances the life sciences through broad programmes reflecting the concepts and high-resolution approaches of modern biological research. It follows on from former ELSO meetings to provide an annual life sciences forum for scientific exchange in Europe.

The deadline for abstract submission and discounted early registration for The EMBO Meeting 2009 is 25 April. Online submission and registration can be found at the conference website: http://the-embo-meeting.org. For delegates with young families, onsite childcare will be available thanks to a New Scholars' Grant from The Elsevier Foundation.

"EMBO is an established leader in stimulating and supporting scientific exchange across borders," said Hermann Bujard, EMBO Director. "The EMBO Meeting is an exciting opportunity for scientists, young and old, to come together to share the latest science, exchange ideas, forge new collaborations and develop new research projects."

Boasting a speaker faculty of more than 120 well-known names in molecular life sciences, The EMBO Meeting 2009 offers a programme that spans the life science disciplines with keynote addresses and plenary sessions focused on three themes: stem cells, signalling pathways and chromosome dynamics. Workshops and poster sessions will further extend these themes and address additional current topics, ensuring a blend of subjects relevant to present-day molecular biology.

Confirmed speakers include: Conference participants are expected to come from Europe and worldwide to meet at the Amsterdam RAI convention centre from 29 August to 1 September 2009. Sponsored symposia and industry exhibits, career forums and skill development workshops, networking events, prizes and award ceremonies will complement the scientific programme.
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About EMBO

The European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) promotes excellence in molecular life sciences in Europe by recognizing and fostering talented scientists. Since 1964, leading scientists are elected annually to become EMBO Members based on proven excellence in research. Members number more than 1300 today. Forty-eight scientists from the EMBO membership have received the Nobel Prize.

Leading peer-reviewed journals - The EMBO Journal, EMBO reports and Molecular Systems Biology - span a broad spectrum of topics of molecular biology and reflect how science is shaping the world. A new journal, EMBO Molecular Medicine, publishes original research offering molecular insight into the cellular and systemic processes underlying human disease.

EMBO funding, training and networking activities impact thousands of scientists every year, promoting collaboration in all areas of molecular biology - within its 27 member states, in Europe and neighbouring countries, and worldwide. For more information: www.embo.org

EMBO

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