Nav: Home

Study examines racial segregation, inequality of care in NICUs

March 25, 2019

Bottom Line: This observational study looked at the extent of racial segregation and inequality of care for very low-birth-weight and very preterm infants at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across the United States. Nearly 118,000 black, Hispanic, Asian and white infants (born at 401 grams to 1,500 grams or 22 to 29 weeks' gestation) were included in the study that defined two indices: one for segregation (uneven distribution of racial or ethnic groups across NICUs) and one for inequality (concentration of racial or ethnic groups in lower-quality NICUs). Explaining the study findings involves understanding sociodemographic factors along with hospital quality, access and choice for minority women and their babies.

Authors: Erika M. Edwards, Ph.D., of the Vermont Oxford Network, Burlington, Vermont, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.0241)

Editor's Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
-end-
Want to embed a full-text link to this study in your story? This full-text link will be live at the embargo time: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/2728461?guestAccessKey=1f05f83e-160f-4b7f-abc7-dfccc2a21951&utm_source=JAMA Network&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=032519

JAMA Pediatrics

Related Preterm Infants Articles:

Prolonged antibiotic treatment may alter preterm infants' microbiome
Treating preterm infants with antibiotics for more than 20 months appears to promote the development of multidrug-resistant gut bacteria, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
Growth failure in preterm infants tied to altered gut bacteria
Extremely premature infants who fail to grow as expected have delayed development of their microbiome, or communities of bacteria and other micro-organisms living in the gut, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports.
Breastmilk antibody protects preterm infants from deadly intestinal disease
Human and mouse experiments show that an antibody in breastmilk is necessary to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis -- an often deadly bacterial disease of the intestine.
New noninvasive ventilation strategy allows preterm infants to breathe freely
Preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) face heightened risks of death, critical illness, and prolonged hospitalization, particularly if they progress to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).
Can a protein in cord blood predict risk of death, cerebral palsy in preterm infants?
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that some preterm babies born without haptoglobin, a protein in blood cells, have higher odds of brain bleeding, cerebral palsy and death.
More Preterm Infants News and Preterm Infants Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...