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In vivo data show effects of spaceflight microgravity on stem cells and tissue regeneration

March 25, 2019

New Rochelle, NY, March 25, 2019-A new review of data from 12 spaceflight experiments and simulated microgravity studies has shown that microgravity does not have a negative effect on stem-like cell-dependent tissue regeneration in newts, but in some tissues regeneration is faster and more robust. This valuable in vivo data has implications for understanding and managing the ability for repair and regeneration of human tissues during spaceflight. The review is published in Stem Cells and Development, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the Stem Cells and Development website through April 25, 2019.

The article entitled "Behavior of Stem-Like Cells, Precursors for Tissue Regeneration in Urodela, Under Conditions of Microgravity" was coauthored by Eleonora N. Grigoryan and Elena A. Radugina, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow. The researchers summarized their research conducted over many years in which they focused on the effects of microgravity on stem-like cells that served as the source for new eye, limb, and tail tissue in newts, a vertebrate that has profound regenerative potential. Microgravity promoted stem-like cell proliferation by as much as 2-fold in some tissues, leading to the formation of bigger and more developed regenerates. Exposure to microgravity had relatively long-lasting effects.

"This insightful and comprehensive review allows the world's tissue engineering community access to 30 years of research on the primary model of vertebrate regeneration," says Editor-in-Chief Graham C. Parker, PhD, The Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI.
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About the Journal

Stem Cells and Development is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published 24 times per year in print and online. The Journal is dedicated to communication and objective analysis of developments in the biology, characteristics, and therapeutic utility of stem cells, especially those of the hematopoietic system. A complete table of contents and free sample issue may be viewed on the Stem Cells and Development website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Cellular Reprogramming, Tissue Engineering, and Human Gene Therapy. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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