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An acute respiratory infection runs into the most common noncommunicable epidemic -- COVID-19 and cardiovascular diseases

March 25, 2020

What The Viewpoint Says: Emerging as an acute infectious disease, COVID-19 may be- come a chronic epidemic similar to influenza because of genetic re- combination. Therefore, we should be ready for the reemergence of COVID-19 or other coronaviruses.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.0934)

Editor's Note: The article includes funding/support disclosures. Please see the articles for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflicts of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.
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Media advisory: The full article is linked to this news release.

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JAMA Cardiology

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