A product for the detection and characterization of brucellosis launched at University of Navarra

March 26, 2008

Ignacio López-Goñi and David García, researchers of the Department of Microbiology and Parasitology of the University of Navarra, have launched a new product for the detection and characterization of the Brucella bacteria, which is the causative agent for brucellosis, also known as Mediterranean fever. Their product is a commercial analysis kit, sold under the brand name "Bruce-ladder," and was developed in collaboration with Ingenasa, a Madrid-based business dedicated to applied biotechnology in the areas of animal and human health and food safety.

Bruce-ladder permits the identification and differentiation of the microorganism via the amplification of sequences of specific genes using the PCR (polymerase chain reaction) technique. In order to develop this product, these microbiologists of the School of Sciences analyzed the complete sequences of the genomes of various distinct species of Brucella, which permitted them to design a system capable of differentiating them in a single test, and in less than 24 hours.

The novelty of this techniques derives from the fact that is able to distinguish all the known species of Brucella, including vaccine lines and the isolated species present in marine mammals.

A more rapid and safe analysis

"Up to now, differentiation of Brucella was only performed in central laboratories, by means of complicated biochemical and serological techniques, handling the bacteria themselves, which involved a risk for the laboratory personnel. Now, with this new molecular test, the bacteria samples can be analyzed in a simpler and more rapid manner, without having to handle the bacteria directly", as the microbiologists of the University of Navarra explained. The kit has been tested by various leading laboratories in France, Belgium and Portugal, and has been approved by the National Brucellosis Reference Center, in Granada.

Brucellosis is an infectious disease which affects both livestock and persons. According to the World Health Organization, brucellosis is part of a group of diseases, which also includes rabies and anthrax, which are considered "forgotten" diseases, and are strongly related to poverty. The incidence of brucellosis is very high in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America, and it is a factor in the lack of economic progress and development in these areas of the world. This new kit will aid in its diagnosis, and will permit epidemiological studies which will help to control and eventually eradicate the disease.
-end-


Elhuyar Fundazioa

Related Bacteria Articles from Brightsurf:

Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria
A research team from the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) is investigating how pathogens influence the immune response of their host with genetic variation.

How bacteria fertilize soya
Soya and clover have their very own fertiliser factories in their roots, where bacteria manufacture ammonium, which is crucial for plant growth.

Bacteria might help other bacteria to tolerate antibiotics better
A new paper by the Dynamical Systems Biology lab at UPF shows that the response by bacteria to antibiotics may depend on other species of bacteria they live with, in such a way that some bacteria may make others more tolerant to antibiotics.

Two-faced bacteria
The gut microbiome, which is a collection of numerous beneficial bacteria species, is key to our overall well-being and good health.

Microcensus in bacteria
Bacillus subtilis can determine proportions of different groups within a mixed population.

Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria
In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender.

Bacteria must be 'stressed out' to divide
Bacterial cell division is controlled by both enzymatic activity and mechanical forces, which work together to control its timing and location, a new study from EPFL finds.

How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone.

The bacteria building your baby
Australian researchers have laid to rest a longstanding controversy: is the womb sterile?

Hopping bacteria
Scientists have long known that key models of bacterial movement in real-world conditions are flawed.

Read More: Bacteria News and Bacteria Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.