Nav: Home

Novel blueprint for faster implementation of more evidence-based healthcare solutions

March 26, 2018

INDIANAPOLIS -- Scientist-clinicians from the Indiana University Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science, Regenstrief Institute and IU Center for Aging Research have designed, developed and implemented an effective, simple new methodology -- Agile Implementation -- for faster, efficient, scalable, sustainable and effective translation of evidence-based healthcare solutions.

Agile Implementation methodology provides a catalytic platform for transforming the current healthcare delivery system (HC 1.0) into a patient and family centric, high reliability, learning healthcare delivery system (HC 2.0).

Typically, it takes the current healthcare system 17 years to implement only about 15 percent of evidence-based healthcare solutions. Utilizing the Agile Implementation methodology, scientists at Indiana University and the Regenstrief Institute implemented an evidence-based collaborative care model within two years and have sustained this evidence-based model for a decade serving thousands of patients and their family caregivers.

"Agile Implementation: A Blueprint for Implementing Evidence-Based Healthcare Solutions" is published online ahead of print in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

"This is personal -- I want my own family and my patients and their families to get the best evidence-based care with great value and I want this to happen now," said Malaz Boustani, MD, MPH, who leads the Agile Implementation team and is the corresponding author of the blueprint paper. "With Agile Implementation we can effectively and sustainably compress the discovery to delivery translational timeline."

The eight steps of the Agile Implementation methodology outlined in the paper are: 1) identify opportunities; 2) identify evidence-based healthcare services; 3) develop evaluation and termination plans; 4) assemble a team to develop a minimally viable service; 5) perform implementation sprints; 6) monitor implementation performance; 7) monitor whole system performance; and 8) develop a minimally standardized operating procedure.

In the JAGS paper Dr. Boustani and colleagues provide a demonstration of the Agile Implementation process focusing on the Aging Brain Care model.

The Aging Brain Care model is an evidence-based collaborative care model which targets older adults with dementia, depression, or delirium. Dr. Boustani and colleagues developed and have sustained the model for ten years. This innovative aging brain care model has been shown to reduce emergency department visits and hospitalizations while broadening the definition of a patient to include the family members who enable cognitively impaired and depressed individuals to live in the community. A team of physicians, nurses, social workers and community health workers work closely with both the older adult and family caregivers -- in the exam room and in the home, as well as over the phone and via email -- to deliver care to improve brain health for patients and their family caregivers.

Agile Implementation is based on the complex adaptive system and social cognitive theories. Those interested in applying Agile Implementation methodology to their healthcare system or medical practice can participate in the IU Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science's unique training opportunities through workshops, short courses, boot camps or graduate certificate programs. Information is available on the center's website.

Agile Implementation is a modern-day formula for quality improvement. The efficient, sustainable, scalable, and human-centric Agile Implementation methodology can be used in a variety of fields beyond healthcare.
-end-
Authors of the JAGS blueprint paper - a case demonstration study of implementation and sustainability -- in addition to Dr. Boustani, founding director of the IU Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science of the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute and a Regenstrief Institute and IU Center for Aging Research scientist, are Catherine A. Alder, JD, MSW of the Sandra Eskenazi Center for Brain Care Innovation, Eskenazi Health; and Craig A. Solid of Solid Research Group, LLC, St. Paul, Minnesota. Dr. Boustani is the Richard M. Fairbanks Professor of Aging Research at IU School of Medicine and founding director and chief innovation and implementation officer of the Sandra Eskenazi Center for Brain Care Innovation at Eskenazi Health.

Regenstrief Institute

Related Healthcare Articles:

LGBT+ women face barriers to healthcare
New study suggests diversity messaging is not filtering down to frontline staff.
US and China should collaborate, not compete, to bring AI to healthcare
In the wake of the US government ordering the Chinese artificial intelligence company, iCarbonX, to divest its majority ownership stake in the Cambridge, Mass.-based company PatientsLikeMe, Eric Topol, MD, of Scripps Research, has co-written a commentary arguing for more, not less, collaboration between China and the US on artificial intelligence (AI) development.
Study highlights need for integrated healthcare for the homeless
A University of Birmingham study has found alarming evidence of severe mental health problems, substance dependence and alcohol misuse amongst homeless population.
Understanding C. auris transmission with the healthcare environment
Researchers have now shown that patients who are heavily colonized with Candida auris on their skin can shed the fungus and contaminate their surroundings.
Three quarters of Americans concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals
Nearly three-quarters (74%) of Americans are concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals, according to new survey data released today by ASHP (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists).
Novel healthcare program for former prisoners reduces recidivism
A healthcare program tailored to the needs of recently released prisoners can significantly reduce recidivism, according to a new study led by a Yale researcher.
Are healthcare providers 'second victims' of medical errors?
Four women with family members who died as a result of preventable medical error penned an editorial for The BMJ urging abandonment of the term 'second victims' to describe healthcare providers who commit errors.
Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace
Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace, according to a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Network driving emergency healthcare research
The Emergency Medicine Foundation -- Australia has successfully piloted a Research Support Network to foster research in more than 30 Queensland public hospital emergency departments.
Healthcare providers -- not hackers -- leak more of your data
New research from Michigan State University and Johns Hopkins University found that more than half of the recent personal health information, or PHI, data breaches were because of internal issues with medical providers -- not because of hackers or external parties.
More Healthcare News and Healthcare Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.