Nav: Home

Using connectomics to understand epilepsy

March 26, 2019

New Rochelle, NY, March 26, 2019--Abnormalities in structural brain networks and how brain regions communicate may underlie a variety of disorders, including epilepsy, which is one focus of a two-part Special Issue on the Brain Connectome in Brain Connectivity, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text articles free on the Brain Connectivity website through April 26, 2019.

The Special Issues were led by Guest Editors Brent Munsell, PhD, College of Charleston (SC), Guorong Wu, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Leonardo Bonilha, MD, PhD, Medical University of South Carolina (Charleston), and Paul Laurienti, MD, PhD, Wake Forest School of Medicine (Winston-Salem, NC)

This second special issue includes the article entitled "Effective Connectivity within the Default Mode Network in Left Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Findings from the Epilepsy Connectome Project," --with results reported from the Epilepsy Connectome Project--contributed by Mary Meyerand, Jeffrey Binder and colleagues from University of Wisconsin-Madison, Medical College of Wisconsin (Milwaukee), and Froedtert Hospital (Milwaukee). Individuals with epilepsy can have memory impairment. Therefore, the researchers studied the default mode network that is a collection of brain regions involved in memory function. The results showed a difference in these memory-related connections between healthy individuals and individuals with epilepsy. The researchers identified an excitatory connection association with inhibition of formation of the left hippocampal region in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

In another article, "Comparison of Methods to Identify Molecules in Noisy or Incomplete Brain Networks," Nitin Williams and colleagues from University of Helsinki (Finland), University of Genoa (Italy), Niguardo Hospital (Milan, Italy), HUS Medical Imaging Center (Helsinki, Finland), and University of Glasgow (UK) compare four different approaches to account for missing connections. The researchers offer their recommendations for what method is best to use in which setting to obtain the missing data.
-end-
About the Journal

Brain Connectivity is the essential peer-reviewed journal covering groundbreaking findings in the rapidly advancing field of connectivity research at the systems and network levels. Published 10 times per year in print and online, the Journal is under the leadership of Founding and Co-Editors-in-Chief Christopher Pawela, PhD, Assistant Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin, and Bharat Biswal, PhD, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology. It includes original peer-reviewed papers, review articles, point-counterpoint discussions on controversies in the field, and a product/technology review section. To ensure that scientific findings are rapidly disseminated, articles are published Instant Online within 72 hours of acceptance, with fully typeset, fast-track publication within 4 weeks. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Brain Connectivity website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative medical and biomedical peer-reviewed journals, including Journal of Neurotrauma and Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, newsmagazines, and books is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Related Epilepsy Articles:

Good news for kids with epilepsy
There's good news for kids with epilepsy. While several new drugs have come out in the last several years for adults with epilepsy, making those drugs available for children and teenagers has been delayed due to the challenges of testing new drugs on children.
People with epilepsy: Tell us about rare risk of death
People with epilepsy want their health care providers to tell them about a rare risk of death associated with the disorder, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017.
New epilepsy gene network identified by scientists
Scientists have discovered a gene network in the brain associated with epilepsy.
Epilepsy -- why do seizures sometimes continue after surgery?
New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Brain, has highlighted the potential reasons why many patients with severe epilepsy still continue to experience seizures even after surgery.
Redox biomarker could predict progression of epilepsy
Approximately 2.9 million people in the United States suffer from epilepsy, according to the CDC.
Many Malaysian children with epilepsy are vitamin D deficient
Long-term use of antiepileptic drugs is a significant risk factor for vitamin D deficiency in children with epilepsy.
Changes in heart activity may signal epilepsy
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have found that the parasympathetic nervous system modulates breathing and slows the heart rate of sleeping children with epilepsy substantially more than in healthy children.
Few answers in understanding death from epilepsy
To increase understanding of mortality in epilepsy, including SUDEP, Partners Against Mortality in Epilepsy (PAME) unites physicians, scientists, health care professionals, people with epilepsy, caregivers and bereaved family members for a unique conference that facilitates collaboration and spurs action.
New insights into epilepsy drug Retigabine
A study published ahead of print in the Journal of General Physiology has revealed new insights into Retigabine, a known pharmacological treatment for epilepsy.
Are women with epilepsy using effective contraception?
In the largest study of contraceptive practices of women with epilepsy, 30 percent did not use highly effective contraception despite being at higher risk of having children with fetal malformations due to the anti-epilepsy medications they take.

Related Epilepsy Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Jumpstarting Creativity
Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".