Nav: Home

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Joaninha affecting Mauritius

March 26, 2019

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Joaninha as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean triggering warnings in the island nation of Mauritius.

Mauritius is an island nation, known for its beaches, lagoons and reefs. It is located to the northeast of Reunion Island.

The Mauritius Meteorological Services (MMS) issued several warnings on Joaninha. On March 26 a Strong wind and High Wave warning were in effect for Rodrigues valid until 10 a.m. local time on Wednesday, March 27, 2019.

MMS noted "The intense tropical cyclone Joaninha evolving to the east of Rodrigues is causing strong southerly winds to blow over the island. Gusts may reach 100 kph (62mph) in places. The cyclone is also generating heavy swells of the order of 5 to 7 meters (16 to 23 feet) which are influencing the sea state around Rodrigues. Also storm surge will cause a rise in the sea water level of about 1.5 meters (5 feet) above the normal tides which will result in the inundation of low lying coastal areas particularly to the east, south and south-west."

On March 26, 2019, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Joaninha. Joaninha had a 15 nautical-mile wide eye surrounded by powerful thunderstorms. Bands of thunderstorms spiraled into the center of circulation from the eastern quadrant.

On March 26 at 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) Joaninha had maximum sustained winds near 115 knots (132 mph/213 kph). Joaninha was centered near 19.6 degrees south latitude and 65.2 degrees east longitude. That's about 86 nautical miles (99 miles/ 159 km) east of Port Mathurin, Mauritius

Joaninha is moving through an area of warm waters, which will continue to fuel it. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that the wind shear, outside winds that can affect a storm at different altitudes, was light, so it will not affect the storm on its track to the south for the next day or two.

For local updates from the MMS, visit: http://metservice.intnet.mu
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Cyclone Articles:

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone's Vayu getting stretched
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean, it captured an infrared image that revealed Tropical Cyclone Vayu was elongating.
NASA takes Tropical Cyclone's Vayu's temperature
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean and took the temperature of Tropical Cyclone Vayu as it moved northward in the Arabian Sea.
NASA catches development of Tropical Cyclone 02A
Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite provided confirmation of the development of Tropical Cyclone 02A in the Arabian Sea, Northern Indian Ocean.
NASA goes infrared on powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani
NASA's Aqua satellite focused an infrared eye on a very powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani as it approached landfall in northeastern India.
NASA finds a more circular Tropical Cyclone Lorna
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of what appeared to be a more organized Tropical Cyclone Lorna.
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Pola near Fiji
Tropical Cyclone Pola was passing near the Southern Pacific country of Fiji when NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the storm in infrared light and found it strengthening.
NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Wutip organizing
Tropical Depression 02W has organized and strengthened into a tropical storm.
NASA looks at Tropical Cyclone Funani's rainfall rates
Tropical Cyclone Funani continued tracking southeast through the Southern Indian Ocean on Feb.
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 33W dissipating
When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Ca Mau Peninsula it captured a visible image of the dissipating former Tropical Cyclone 33W.
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Bouchra being blown apart
Tropical Cyclone Bouchra may have been re-born over the weekend of Nov.
More Cyclone News and Cyclone Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.