Investigating spaceflight-associated changes in astronauts

March 26, 2020

What The Study Did: Head congestion is one of the most common symptoms experienced by astronauts during spaceflight. This observational study examined preflight and postflight head magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of 35 astronauts who participated in either a short-duration (30 days or less) Space Shuttle mission or a long-duration (greater than 30 days) International Space Station mission. Researchers  investigated whether there were differences in the development of certain physiological changes of the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells associated with symptoms of head congestion.

Authors: Donna R. Roberts, M.D., of the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2020.0228)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the articles for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflicts of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.
-end-
Media advisory: The full study and commentary is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaoto.2020.0228?guestAccessKey=ab4ab54b-38e8-4ebd-83c6-f82fff482d8f&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=032620

JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery

Related Astronauts Articles from Brightsurf:

Speed of space storms key to protecting astronauts and satellites from radiation
Measuring the speed of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as they erupt from the sun, in addition to their size, found to be crucial in providing accurate early warnings that keep astronauts and technology safe.

Study reveals how spaceflight affects risk of blood clots in female astronauts
A study of female astronauts has assessed the risk of blood clots associated with spaceflight.

New clues to predict the risks astronauts will face from space radiation on long missions
A team led by researchers at Colorado State University used a novel approach to test assumptions in a model used by NASA to predict health risks for astronauts.

Investigating spaceflight-associated changes in astronauts
Head congestion is one of the most common symptoms experienced by astronauts during spaceflight.

The ways astronauts prep for spaceflight could benefit cancer patients, say researchers
During spaceflight, astronauts experience similar physical stress as cancer patients undergoing treatments such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Astronauts less likely to faint on Earth if they exercise in space; findings may help others with fainting issues
Up to two hours of endurance and resistance exercises daily during a long space flight mission, combined with IV fluid replacement after landing, helps astronauts prevent dizziness and fainting during normal activity when they return to Earth.

Can exercise, swimming goggles help protect astronauts against spaceflight-associated changes to eye, vision?
Astronauts on long missions at the International Space Station can experience changes to their eyes and vision that can last for years.

Scientists tackle major challenges to sending astronauts to search for life on Mars
An international team of researchers, which includes scientists from McMaster's School of Geography & Earth Sciences, NASA, and others, is tackling one of the biggest problems of space travel to Mars: what happens when we get there?

Prolonged spaceflight could weaken astronauts' immune systems
University of Arizona researchers led the first study to report impaired NK-cell function during long-duration space travel.

Do astronauts need sunscreen? (video)
Space is full of potentially dangerous radiation. Here on Earth, our atmosphere and magnetic field protect us from the worst of it.

Read More: Astronauts News and Astronauts Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.