USGS Scientists To Speak On Rare Plants And Invasive Species At Santa Barbara Symposium

March 26, 1999

U.S. Geological Survey scientists of the Western Ecological Research Center will report on the effects of exotic animals on native plants in Channel Islands National Park at the 5th California Islands Symposium, in Santa Barbara, Calif., Mar. 29-Apr. 1.

Plant ecologist Kathryn McEachern will present information on soft-leaved Indian paintbrush, which is found only on Santa Rosa Island and was listed as federally endangered in 1997. McEachern said that cattle have been removed from Santa Rosa Island, and deer and elk numbers will be reduced. Continued monitoring by USGS scientists and National Park Service staff will show whether this reduction will help soft-leaved Indian paintbrush to recover.

Botanist Katie Chess will discuss the effects of feral pigs on the distribution and recovery of island jepsonia, a native plant that occurs only on five of the California Channel Islands and Guadelupe Island. Island jepsonia was designated a federal category 2 species in 1993 because of population declines related to feral animal activity on the islands.

In a third presentation, former USGS botanist Pat Corry will discuss results of a pilot, multidisciplinary research project on factors affecting native shrub recovery in grasslands where nonnative annual grasses have become established following grazing by cattle, deer, elk and rabbits.

Kathryn McEachern will also participate in interagency poster presentations on island restoration and conservation strategies.

The 5th California Islands Symposium, sponsored by the Minerals Management Service, will be held at the Santa Barbara Natural History Museum, 2559 Puesta Del Sol Road. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. throughout the symposium. Session categories include archaeology, botany, cultural anthropology, geographic information systems, geology, marine ecology, marine invertebrate zoology, physical oceanography, paleontology and terrestrial invertebrate zoology. There are no Thursday presentations.
-end-
As the nation's largest water, earth and biological science and civilian mapping agency, the USGS works in cooperation with more than 2000 organizations across the country to provide reliable, impartial, scientific information to resource managers, planners, and other customers. This information is gathered in every state by USGS scientists to minimize the loss of life and property from natural disasters, contribute to the sound conservation, economic and physical development of the nation's natural resources, and enhance the quality of life by monitoring water, biological, energy and mineral resources.

The news release may also be found online at http://www.usgs.gov/public/press/public_affairs/press_releases/index.html

In-depth information about USGS programs may be found on the USGS home page: http://www.usgs.gov. To receive the latest USGS news releases automatically by email, send a request to listproc@listserver.usgs.gov. Specify the listserver(s) of interest from the following names: water-pr: geologic-hazards-pr; biological-pr; mapping-pr; products-pr; lecture-pr. In the body of the message write: subscribe (name of listserver) (your name). Example: subscribe water-pr joe smith.



US Geological Survey

Related Native Plants Articles from Brightsurf:

When plants attack: parasitic plants use ethylene as a host invasion signal
Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology have found that parasitic plants use the plant hormone ethylene as a signal to invade host plants.

210 scientists highlight state of plants and fungi in Plants, People, Planet special issue
The Special Issue, 'Protecting and sustainably using the world's plants and fungi', brings together the research - from 210 scientists across 42 countries - behind the 2020 State of the World's Plants and Fungi report, also released today by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Native bushland's fertility secret
In hotter, dryer conditions with climate change, a secret agent for more sustainable agricultural production could lie in harvesting the diverse beneficial soil microbiome in native bushland settings, scientists say.

Native bees also facing novel pandemic
There is growing evidence that another ''pandemic'' has been infecting bees around the world for the past two decades, and is spreading: a fungal pathogen known as Nosema.

Viewing dopamine receptors in their native habitat
A new study led by UT Southwestern researchers reveals the structure of the active form of one type of dopamine receptor, known as D2, embedded in a phospholipid membrane.

The revolt of the plants: The arctic melts when plants stop breathing
A joint research team from POSTECH and the University of Zurich identifies a physiologic mechanism in vegetation as cause for Artic warming.

Native Americans and higher cigarette use: Stereotype goes up in smoke
University of Arizona Health Sciences study finds when whites and Native Americans in comparable income and education levels are compared, whites consume more cigarettes and are more nicotine dependent.

Predicting non-native invasions in Antarctica
A new study identifies the non-native species most likely to invade the Antarctic Peninsula region over the next decade.

Native approaches to fire management
In collaboration with tribes in Northern California, researchers examined traditional fire management practices and found that these approaches, if expanded, could strengthen cultures and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires in Northern California.

When invasive plants take root, native animals pay the price
Jacob Barney, associate professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences' School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, graduate researcher Becky Fletcher, and a team of five other doctoral students conducted the first-ever comprehensive meta-analytic review examining the ecological impacts of invasive plants by exploring how animals -- indigenous and exotic -- respond to these nonnative plants.

Read More: Native Plants News and Native Plants Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.