Living long, living well

March 27, 2009

Waltham, Mass.--How does inflammation, brought on by stress, affect aging? What can we do to avert the looming public health and economic crisis of an epidemic of neurologic diseases caused by a rapidly expanding elderly population? How do older adults manage to keep a rosy outlook in the face of inevitable decline? How does exercise enhance memory function?

These and a host of other questions are the focus of the inaugural conference of the Brandeis Lifespan Initiative on Healthy Aging (LIHA) Friday, April 3, 2009, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at the Hassenfeld Conference Center at Brandeis University. Free and open to the public, the conference will showcase Brandeis' interdisciplinary research on healthy aging, focusing on biomedical, behavioral, and social factors that influence aging.

Anyone with a personal, professional, or scholarly interest in cutting edge research on healthy aging, from students and consumers of all ages, to elder advocates and academics, will find the half-day open forum stimulating and relevant.

Short, engaging presentations will address topics that range from the impact of hearing loss on cognitive abilities and the complex role of DNA in aging, to why nursing homes need to change the conventional model of care. There will also be time for questions after each presentation, and posters will graphically display key research findings. For a complete schedule of events, please visit http://www.brandeis.edu/lifespaninitiative/. RSVP healthyaging@brandeis.edu or call 781-736-3302.

"We take a lifespan approach that emphasizes prevention and intervention as early as possible, in contrast to the more conventional focus on treatment after problems or declines have begun," explained Professor Margie Lachman, LIHA's chair. "Although it is often "never too late" to make a difference, our research suggests that it is "never too soon" to begin thinking about successful aging."
-end-
LIHA is a multidisciplinary, multicultural, and integrative initiative drawing scholars from biology, chemistry, medicine, neuroscience, social policy, psychology, sociology, economics, business, anthropology, history, human factors engineering, nutrition, art and literature. The initiative is establishing partnerships with other universities and institutions in Greater Boston committed to advancing healthy aging and lifelong wellbeing.

Brandeis University

Related Stress Articles from Brightsurf:

Stress-free gel
Researchers at The University of Tokyo studied a new mechanism of gelation using colloidal particles.

Early life stress is associated with youth-onset depression for some types of stress but not others
Examining the association between eight different types of early life stress (ELS) and youth-onset depression, a study in JAACAP, published by Elsevier, reports that individuals exposed to ELS were more likely to develop a major depressive disorder (MDD) in childhood or adolescence than individuals who had not been exposed to ELS.

Red light for stress
Researchers from the Institute of Industrial Science at The University of Tokyo have created a biphasic luminescent material that changes color when exposed to mechanical stress.

How do our cells respond to stress?
Molecular biologists reverse-engineer a complex cellular structure that is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS

How stress remodels the brain
Stress restructures the brain by halting the production of crucial ion channel proteins, according to research in mice recently published in JNeurosci.

Why stress doesn't always cause depression
Rats susceptible to anhedonia, a core symptom of depression, possess more serotonin neurons after being exposed to chronic stress, but the effect can be reversed through amygdala activation, according to new research in JNeurosci.

How plants handle stress
Plants get stressed too. Drought or too much salt disrupt their physiology.

Stress in the powerhouse of the cell
University of Freiburg researchers discover a new principle -- how cells protect themselves from mitochondrial defects.

Measuring stress around cells
Tissues and organs in the human body are shaped through forces generated by cells, that push and pull, to ''sculpt'' biological structures.

Cellular stress at the movies
For the first time, biological imaging experts have used a custom fluorescence microscope and a novel antibody tagging tool to watch living cells undergoing stress.

Read More: Stress News and Stress Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.