Kaixin Jieyu Fang for treatment of vascular depression

March 27, 2014

The Chinese compound Kaixin Jieyu Fang can be used to treat vascular depression; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Dr. Ying Zhang and co-workers from Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences in China This study established a rat model of chronic cerebral ischemia-caused white matter damage by ligation of the bilateral common carotid arteries. Rats received daily intragastric administration of a suspension of Kaixin Jieyu Fang powder. Kaixin Jieyu Fang was made from two prescriptions of Kaixin San and Sini San supplemented with Radix Morindae Offcinalis, consisting of eight Chinese herbs including Radix Ginseng, Radix Bupleuri, Fructus Aurantii Immaturus, Radix Morindae Officinalis, Poria, Radix Polygalae, Radix Paeoniae Rubra and Radix Glycytthizae. After treatment, the degree of white matter damage in the cerebral ischemia rat model was alleviated, Bcl-2 protein and mRNA expression in brain tissue increased, and Bax protein and mRNA expression decreased. These results, published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 9, No. 1, 2014), indicate that Kaixin Jieyu Fang can alleviate cerebral white matter damage, and the underlying mechanism is associated with regulation of Bcl-2/Bax protein and mRNA expression, which is one of possible mechanism behind the protective effect of Kaixin Jieyu Fang against vascular depression.
-end-
Article: "Mechanism underlying the protective effect of Kaixin Jieyu Fang on vascular depression following cerebral white matter damage," by Ying Zhang, Shijing Huang, Yanyun Wang, Junhua Pan, Jun Zheng, Xianhui Zhang, Yuxia Chen, Duojiao Li (Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053, China)

Zhang Y, Huang SJ, Wang YY, Pan JH, Zheng J, Zhang XH, Chen YX, Li DJ. Mechanism underlying the protective effect of Kaixin Jieyu Fang on vascular depression following cerebral white matter damage. Neural Regen Res. 2014;9(1):61-68.

Contact:

Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research
http://www.nrronline.org/

Neural Regeneration Research

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