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Gut microbiome research takes center stage in APS-ASPET Presidential Symposium series

March 27, 2019

Rockville, Md. (March 27, 2019)--Leading physiology and pharmacology researchers will speak in a four-part series centered on the gut microbiome--the microbe population living in the digestive tract--and its role in wound recovery, hypertension and nervous system function. The symposia series is organized by American Physiological Society (APS) President Jeff Sands, MD, and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET) President Edward T. Morgan, PhD, both of Emory University School of Medicine. The APS-ASPET Presidential Symposia Series will be part of the APS and APSET annual meetings at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.

Workshop on Microbiome Research: What You Need to Know
Saturday, April 6, 1 p.m. -- Orange County Convention Center (OCCC) Room W311EF

Chair: Andrew D. Patterson, PhD, Pennsylvania State University; Co-chair: Meredith Hullar, PhD, University of Washington

Speakers:

"Experimental design for mouse studies"
Cathryn R. Nagler, PhD, University of Chicago

"Experimental design for human studies"
Meredith Hullar, PhD, University of Washington

"Bioinformatics: sequencing and metagenomics"
Mehrbod Estaki, MS, University of British Columbia

"Defining the chemical complexity of the microbiome through metabolomics"
Andrew D. Patterson, PhD, Pennsylvania State University

Microbiome. Gut Microbiome and Metabolic Disorders

Sunday, April 7, 8:30 a.m. -- OCCC Room W314

Chair: Jeff M. Sands, MD, Emory University School of Medicine; Co-chair: Edward T. Morgan, MD, Emory School of Medicine

Speakers:

"Acetate mediates a gut microbiome-brain-beta-cell axis: implications for obesity and cancer"
Rachel J. Perry, PhD, Yale University

"Antibiotic use and the gut microbiome"
Martin J. Blaser, MD, New York University

"The role of diet and small bowel microbiota in health and metabolic diseases"
Eugene B. Chang, MD, University of Chicago
-end-
NOTE TO JOURNALISTS: To schedule an interview with a member of the research team, please contact the communications@the-aps.org>APS Communications Office or 301-634-7314. Find more research highlights in the APS Press Room.

About Experimental Biology 2019

Experimental Biology is an annual meeting comprised of more than 14,000 scientists and exhibitors from five sponsoring societies and multiple guest societies. With a mission to share the newest scientific concepts and research findings shaping clinical advances, the meeting offers an unparalleled opportunity for exchange among scientists from across the United States and the world who represent dozens of scientific areas, from laboratory to translational to clinical research.

Physiology is the study of how molecules, cells, tissues and organs function in health and disease. Established in 1887, the American Physiological Society (APS) was the first U.S. society in the biomedical sciences field. The Society represents more than 10,000 members and publishes 15 peer-reviewed journals with a worldwide readership.

American Physiological Society

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