Nanoparticles for biosensors

March 28, 2004

Fluorescent nanoparticles that can be attached to biological molecules are being developed for use in microscopic sensor devices. Philip Costanzo, a graduate student in chemistry at UC Davis, and Timothy Patten, associate professor of chemistry, have prepared nanoparticles of cadmium sulphide and silicon dioxide coated with polymer chains with biotin attached to the ends. When avidin, a protein that binds to biotin, is added, the nanoparticles cluster into larger aggregates. The researchers used dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy and other methods to study these aggregates.

These nanoparticles could be used both to fluorescently label biological molecules and as a means to transport them in an electric field, Patten said. A proposed device would use microscopic needles to take up very small volumes of tissue fluid through the skin, mix it with nanoparticles designed to detect particular molecules, and move them to another part of the device for detection.

The work is funded by an NSF grant, the NSF IGERT grant to UC Davis' NEAT (Nanophases in the Environment, Agriculture and Technology) center and a collaborator's DARPA grant. Contact: Timothy Patten, Chemistry, (530) 754-6181, patten@chem.ucdavis.edu.
-end-
Paper: Synthesis, assembly mechanism, and sensor application of nanostructures comprised of biotinylated CdS@SiO2 nanoparticles

Authors: Philip. J. Costanzo, Timothy E. Patten, UC Davis; Thomas P.A. Seery, University of Connecticut

Session: General Papers

Session date and time: 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Sunday, March 28

University of California - Davis

Related Nanoparticles Articles from Brightsurf:

An ionic forcefield for nanoparticles
Nanoparticles are promising drug delivery tools but they struggle to get past the immune system's first line of defense: proteins in the blood serum that tag potential invaders.

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles
Products derived from nanotechnology are efficient and highly sought-after, yet their effects on the environment are still poorly understood.

How to get more cancer-fighting nanoparticles to where they are needed
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have discovered a dose threshold that greatly increases the delivery of cancer-fighting drugs into a tumour.

Nanoparticles: Acidic alert
Researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have synthesized nanoparticles that can be induced by a change in pH to release a deadly dose of ionized iron within cells.

3D reconstructions of individual nanoparticles
Want to find out how to design and build materials atom by atom?

Directing nanoparticles straight to tumors
Modern anticancer therapies aim to attack tumor cells while sparing healthy tissue.

Sweet nanoparticles trick kidney
Researchers engineer tiny particles with sugar molecules to prevent side effect in cancer therapy.

A megalibrary of nanoparticles
Using straightforward chemistry and a mix-and-match, modular strategy, researchers have developed a simple approach that could produce over 65,000 different types of complex nanoparticles.

Dialing up the heat on nanoparticles
Rapid progress in the field of metallic nanotechnology is sparking a science revolution that is likely to impact all areas of society, according to professor of physics Ventsislav Valev and his team at the University of Bath in the UK.

Illuminating the world of nanoparticles
Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a light-based device that can act as a biosensor, detecting biological substances in materials; for example, harmful pathogens in food samples.

Read More: Nanoparticles News and Nanoparticles Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.