Nav: Home

Announcing the inaugural online immuno-oncology symposium

March 28, 2017

Oncology Central is delighted to be hosting, "Practical clinical aspects of immuno-oncology" a 2-day online symposium exploring the latest developments in cancer immunotherapy, chaired by Professor Angus Dalgleish (St George's, University of London).

Immunotherapy is a huge and still-emerging area within oncology, which is having a significant impact on the way patients with certain malignancies are being treated. This year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) named cancer immunotherapy as their clinical cancer Advance of the Year for a second consecutive year, highlighting its continuing importance in changing the face of cancer care.

At the end of June, Oncology Central is hosting a free 2-day online educational symposium, chaired by Professor Angus Dalgleish (St George's, University of London) delivering a series of talks and discussions by leading experts in the field, aiming to review the current status of immunotherapy in the clinic.

This event will be delivered on a highly interactive platform, and will offer delegates a unique opportunity to further explore recent trends and data in the field of cancer immunotherapy, as well as the opportunity to discuss and debate how these may impact everyday practice. Our experts will present on key areas such as rational combinations of immunotherapies with other therapies and management of therapy-related toxicities, as well as looking at optimization of these therapies and discussing the need for better biomarkers of response.

"As immunotherapy continues to make waves within oncology, we are excited to be able to offer this unique, fully online event in collaboration with some of the leading experts in the field," commented Jade Parker, Editor of Oncology Central. "Our encompassing programme aims to deliver a well-rounded update on the impact these therapies have had in the clinic thus far and to look to the future of the field."

Speakers already confirmed include Roy Herbst of Yale School of Medicine (CT, USA) and Hossein Borghaei of Fox Chase Cancer Center (PA, USA), with more to be announced soon.

This online symposium will be certified for CME credit. To find out more and to register for this free event, please click here: http://conferences.oncology-central.com/
-end-
About Oncology Central

Oncology is a fast-moving, multidisciplinary field at the forefront of medical research. At Oncology Central, the online resource powered by Future Science Group, we unite all aspects of oncology to support synergistic progression in the field through collaboration and learning.

Designed exclusively for medical professionals, and endorsed by an expanding board of expert Ambassadors from across the globe, we deliver high-quality and relevant content in an accessible and innovative way. Every day we aim to help you stay up to date with the latest developments in cancer research by providing the latest news, opinion, peer-reviewed journal articles, multimedia and exclusive content that can be digested quickly and easily.

Find out more: https://www.oncology-central.com

About Future Science Group

Founded in 2001, Future Science Group (FSG) is a progressive publisher focused on breakthrough medical, biotechnological, and scientific research. FSG's portfolio includes two imprints, Future Science and Future Medicine. In addition to this core publishing business, FSG develops specialist eCommunities. Key titles and sites include Bioanalysis Zone, Epigenomics, Nanomedicine and the award-winning Regenerative Medicine.

The aim of FSG is to service the advancement of clinical practice and drug research by enhancing the efficiency of communications among clinicians, researchers and decision-makers, and by providing innovative solutions to their information needs. This is achieved through a customer-centric approach, use of new technologies, products that deliver value-for-money and uncompromisingly high standards. http://www.futuresciencegroup.com

Future Science Group

Related Immunotherapy Articles:

Barrier Proteins in Tumors are Possible Key to Immunotherapy Success
By comparing variations in protein expression in tumor samples from a single melanoma patient, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center say their findings have the potential to reveal some of the mechanisms underlying response or resistance to immunotherapy drugs.
Discovery could guide immunotherapy for lung cancer
Scientists have discovered a new type of immune cell that could predict which lung cancer patients will benefit most from immunotherapy treatment, according to a Cancer Research UK funded study* published today (Monday) in Nature Immunotherapy.
Genetic mutations predict patient response to immunotherapy
Results of a new clinical study establish particular genetic defects in tumors as clinical indicators for successful response to a type of immunotherapy called PD-1 blockade.
'Immunoswitch' particles may be key to more-effective cancer immunotherapy
Scientists at Johns Hopkins have created a nanoparticle that carries two different antibodies capable of simultaneously switching off cancer cells' defensive properties while switching on a robust anticancer immune response in mice.
Early research suggests first immunotherapy for mesothelioma on the horizon
Malignant pleural mesothelioma or MPM is a rare cancer, but its incidence has been rising.
More Immunotherapy News and Immunotherapy Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...