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A compass pointing west

March 28, 2019

Magnets are characterized by the fact that they have a North pole and a South pole. If two common magnets are held close to each other, opposite poles attract and like poles repel each other. This is why magnetic needles, such as those found in a compass, align themselves in the Earth's magnetic field so that we can use them to determine the cardinal directions North and South and, derived from this, East and West. In the world that we experience every day with our senses, this rule is correct. However, if you leave the macroscopic world and dive into depths of much smaller dimensions, this changes. Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and the ETH Zurich have now discovered a very special magnetic interaction at the level of nanoscopic structures made of magnetic layers only a few atoms thick.

The atoms act like tiny compass needles and unfold their effect over tiny distances in the nanometre range, meaning a few millionths of a millimeter. That is why researchers also call them nanomagnets.

The phenomenon that researchers at PSI have now been able to observe is based on an interaction that the two physicists Igor Dzyaloshinskii and Toru Mariya predicted more than 60 years ago. "That was our starting point", says Zhaochu Luo, physicist at PSI and ETH Zurich.

North-West and South-East coupling of atoms

In this interaction, the atomic compass needles do not only align in a North-South direction, but also in an East-West direction. "Where they point depends on how the atoms in their neighbourhood orient themselves", says Zhaochu Luo, first author of the study. For example, if a group of atoms points North, the neighbouring group always points West. And if a group of atoms points South, then the neighbouring atoms orient themselves to the East.

These orientations can be reversed by magnetic fields or electric currents, that is from North to South and vice versa. The neighbouring atomic groups then reorient themselves accordingly, either from West to East or vice versa.

The researchers discovered the coupling of North-West and South-East orientation with the help of a layer of cobalt atoms only 1.6 nanometres thick, which was sandwiched between a platinum layer on one side and an aluminium oxide layer on the other. "The development of these special layers for our experiments alone took about half a year", says Zhaochu Luo. He works in the Mesoscopic Systems research group at PSI lead by Laura Heyderman, who is also professor at ETH Zurich.

What is unusual is that this interaction takes place laterally, that is in one plane. Previously, comparable couplings between nanomagnets could only be detected vertically, with groups of atoms arranged one above the other.

The phenomenon observed jointly by PSI and ETH Zurich researchers enables the development of planar magnetic networks. Among other things, synthetic antiferromagnets can be produced. In these antiferromagnets, atomic groups point either North or South at regular intervals. The number of opposing nanomagnets is approximately the same, so that they neutralize each other in sum. This is why, at first glance, antiferromagnets do not act like magnets - for example, they do not stick to a fridge door.

The neighbouring atoms, which are oriented either to the West or to the East, act as spacers separating the magnets pointing North or South, each of which is as small as a few nanometres. This makes it possible, for example, to build new, more efficient computer memories and switches, which in turn makes microprocessors more powerful.

Logical gates for computers

The individual nanomagnets, which face either North or South, are suitable for constructing logic gates. A logic gate is a building block in a computer and functions as a kind of switch. Signals enter these gates and are then processed into an output signal. In a computer, many of these gates are networked to perform operations. Such a gate can also be constructed with the help of nanomagnets aligned to the North or South. These are analogous to processors commonly used today with transistors processing signals in binary form, which interpret all signals as zero or one. Nanomagnets that are oriented either North or South can also do this. This could make microprocessors more compact and efficient.

According to Pietro Gambardella, who supervised this study with Laura Heyderman, "this work provides a platform to design arrays of linked nanomagnets and achieve all-electric control of planar logic gates and storage devices", the scientists now write in Science.
-end-
The researchers achieved their results in the laboratory and at the Swiss Light Source SLS at PSI.

Text: Paul Scherrer Institute/Sebastian Jutzi

Images are available to download at http://psi.ch/hUFy.

About PSI

The Paul Scherrer Institute PSI develops, builds and operates large, complex research facilities and makes them available to the national and international research community. The institute's own key research priorities are in the fields of matter and materials, energy and environment and human health. PSI is committed to the training of future generations. Therefore about one quarter of our staff are post-docs, post-graduates or apprentices. Altogether PSI employs 2100 people, thus being the largest research institute in Switzerland. The annual budget amounts to approximately CHF 390 million. PSI is part of the ETH Domain, with the other members being the two Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology, ETH Zurich and EPFL Lausanne, as well as Eawag (Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology), Empa (Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology) and WSL (Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research).

Contact

Dr. Luo Zhaochu
Mesoscopic Systems Group
Paul Scherrer Institute, Forschungsstrasse 111, 5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland
Telephone: +41 56 310 54 94, e-mail: zhaochu.luo@psi.ch [English, Chinese]

Prof. Dr. Laura Heyderman
Mesoscopic Systems Group
Paul Scherrer Institute, Forschungsstrasse 111, 5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland
Telephone:+41 56 310 26 13, e-mail: laura.heyderman@psi.ch [English, German, French]

Prof. Dr. Pietro Gambardella
Magnetism and Interface Physics
ETH Zurich, Hönggerbergring 64, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland
Telephone: +41 44 633 07 56, e-mail: pietro.gambardella@mat.ethz.ch [English, German, French, Spanish, Italian]

Original Publication

Chirally coupled nanomagnets
Z. Luo, T. Phuong Dao, A. Hrabec, J. Vijayakumar, A. Kleibert, M. Baumgartner, E. Kirk, J. Cui, T. Savchenko, G. Krishnaswamy, L. J. Heyderman, and P. Gambardella
Science 29 March 2019
DOI: 10.1126/science.aau7913

Paul Scherrer Institute

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