Nav: Home

Boston Children's Hospital launches Feverprints ResearchKit study

March 29, 2016

The Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) and Autoinflammatory Diseases Clinic at Boston Children's Hospital are proud to announce the release of Feverprints, a ResearchKit app for iPhone that will enlist the public's help to answer a surprisingly simple but fundamental question in medicine: What, exactly, is a fever?

Fever is one of the most common signs of infection, but can also indicate the presence of other medical conditions, including autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. While a body temperature of 98.6°F (37°C) is generally considered "normal," this number may not be accurate, as it does not account for temperature differences between individuals, and for one person at various times throughout the day. Better understanding of normal temperature variations will allow doctors to provide better medical care. By using ResearchKit, an open source software framework designed by Apple, Boston Children's Hospital is able to gather data more frequently and more accurately from participants using iPhone.

"Many factors come together to set an individual's 'normal' temperature, such as age, size, time of day and maybe even ancestry," said Jared Hawkins, MMSc, PhD, the director of informatics for IDHA, a member of Boson Children's Computational Health Informatics Program, and one of the Feverprints team leads. "We want to help create a better understanding of the normal temperature variations throughout the day, to learn to use fever as a tool to improve medical diagnosis, and to evaluate the effect of fever medications on symptoms and disease course. By using ResearchKit to bring this study to iPhone, we're able to gather more data about body temperature patterns than ever before possible."

The Feverprints app will help answer those questions by crowdsourcing personal information about body temperature, lifestyle and health. Open to adults in the United States, as well as U.S. children with parental consent, the app will regularly remind users to record their temperature and answer questions about their symptoms, medications, lifestyle and health. The data will be anonymized and logged in a secure database.

The team -- led by Fatma Dedeoglu, MD, director of the Autoinflammatory Diseases Clinic, and Boston Children's rheumatologist Jonathan Hausmann, MD -- will mine the submitted data to refine the range of body temperatures called normal and febrile. They will also use the data to define unique patterns of temperature -- "feverprints" -- that may help clinicians diagnose infections and other diseases more quickly and accurately. In addition, the team will systematically examine how effectively fever-reducing medicines work to reduce temperature in real-world use.

Feverprints is Boston Children's second ResearchKit app. The first, C-Tracker, was launched in 2015 to gather information about the real-world impacts of hepatitis C and drive improvements in treatment.

Feverprints is free and available for download in the App Store.
-end-
About Boston Children's Hospital

Boston Children's Hospital is home to the world's largest research enterprise based at a pediatric medical center, where its discoveries have benefited both children and adults since 1869. More than 1,100 scientists, including seven members of the National Academy of Sciences, 11 members of the Institute of Medicine and 10 members of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute comprise Boston Children's research community. Founded as a 20-bed hospital for children, Boston Children's today is a 404-bed comprehensive center for pediatric and adolescent health care. Boston Children's is also the primary pediatric teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School. For more, visit our Vector and Thriving blogs and follow us on our social media channels: @BostonChildrens, @BCH_Innovation, Facebook and YouTube.

Boston Children's Hospital

Related Body Temperature Articles:

Accelerating rate of temperature rise in the Pyrenees
The Iberian Peninsula is undergoing climate change, with temperatures on the rise, and mountain ranges are not exempt from this trend.
Starvation prompts body temperature, blood sugar changes to tolerate next food limitation
Rats that have experienced past episodes of limited food resources make physiological adaptations that may extend their lives the next time they are faced with starvation.
Level of unconsciousness in brain damaged patients related to body temperature
Circadian rhythms may play a crucial role in the recovery of consciousness of patients with severe brain injuries, a study published in Neurology.
How do we measure temperature? (video)
How do the thermometers in the kitchen or the doctor's office work?
Taking earth's inner temperature
A new study led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) suggests the mantle--the mostly solid, rocky part of Earth's interior that lies between its super-heated core and its outer crustal layer -- may be hotter than previously believed.
How temperature guides where species live and where they'll go
A Princeton University-based study could prove significant in answering among the most enduring questions for ecologists: Why do species live where they do, and what are the factors that keep them there?
Strategies designed to reduce excessive body temperature during exercise are explored
The use of heat-dissipating upper body compression clothing does not help to lower body temperature during exercise.
Temperature drives biodiversity
Why is the diversity of animals and plants so unevenly distributed on our planet?
New process produces hydrogen at much lower temperature
Waseda University researchers have developed a new method for producing hydrogen, which is fast, irreversible, and takes place at much lower temperature using less energy.
Amphetamine may slow rise of body temperature and mask fatigue to enhance endurance, study finds
Amphetamine may slow down the rise of temperature in the body and mask fatigue, which could allow athletes to run significantly longer but result in potentially dangerous overheating of muscles, according to a study.

Related Body Temperature Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...