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Elsevier announces the launch of a new journal: Forensic Chemistry

March 29, 2016

Amsterdam, March 29, 2016 - Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and solutions, today announced the launch of Forensic Chemistry, a new international chemistry journal serving the needs of the forensic science community.

The journal publishes high quality manuscripts focusing on the theory, research and application of chemical science to forensic analysis. The scope of the journal is to include forensic-related molecular and atomic spectrochemical technique, electrochemical techniques, sensors, surface characterization techniques, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, chemometrics and statistics, and separation sciences (e.g. chromatography).

Evidential topics of interest to the journal include, but are not limited to, fingerprint analysis, drug analysis, ignitable liquid residue analysis, and gunshot residue analysis.

This journal will make use of Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). When submitting an article to Forensic Chemistry, authors will be asked to self-assign a TRL to their article. The purpose of the TRL system is to help readers understand the level of maturity of an idea or method, to help track the evolution of readiness of a given technique or method, and to help filter published articles by the expected ease of implementation in an operation setting within a crime lab. For more information about the four TRL levels, please read the full aims and scope on the journal's homepage.

Prof. José R. Almirall, Editor of Forensic Chemistry, said: "The mature discipline of forensic chemistry needed a dedicated journal where research and practice in the diverse forensic applications of chemistry can be reported quickly. Forensic Chemistry offers high visibility and focused attention on the important developments that impact many scientists around the world."

"The field of forensic chemistry has grown substantially over the last few years and researchers are longing for a suitable journal which can assess the chemistry but also take legal and forensic aspects into account", said Elsevier publisher Christian Schulz. "Forensic Chemistry provides exactly this and additionally focuses on quick publication times, open data sharing and the grouping of all articles into four Technology Readiness Levels that will make the material easily accessible to readers."

The first issue of Forensic Chemistry is scheduled to be published by mid-2016. The journal is welcoming submissions. For more information and to submit an article, please visit the journal homepage: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forc.
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About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions -- among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Elsevier Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey -- and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 33,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a world-leading provider of information and analytics for professional and business customers across industries. http://www.elsevier.com

Media contact

Annis Moreira
Marketing Communications Manager
Elsevier
+31 20 4852770
a.moreira@elsevier.com

Elsevier

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