Nav: Home

Elsevier announces the launch of a new journal: Forensic Chemistry

March 29, 2016

Amsterdam, March 29, 2016 - Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and solutions, today announced the launch of Forensic Chemistry, a new international chemistry journal serving the needs of the forensic science community.

The journal publishes high quality manuscripts focusing on the theory, research and application of chemical science to forensic analysis. The scope of the journal is to include forensic-related molecular and atomic spectrochemical technique, electrochemical techniques, sensors, surface characterization techniques, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, chemometrics and statistics, and separation sciences (e.g. chromatography).

Evidential topics of interest to the journal include, but are not limited to, fingerprint analysis, drug analysis, ignitable liquid residue analysis, and gunshot residue analysis.

This journal will make use of Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). When submitting an article to Forensic Chemistry, authors will be asked to self-assign a TRL to their article. The purpose of the TRL system is to help readers understand the level of maturity of an idea or method, to help track the evolution of readiness of a given technique or method, and to help filter published articles by the expected ease of implementation in an operation setting within a crime lab. For more information about the four TRL levels, please read the full aims and scope on the journal's homepage.

Prof. José R. Almirall, Editor of Forensic Chemistry, said: "The mature discipline of forensic chemistry needed a dedicated journal where research and practice in the diverse forensic applications of chemistry can be reported quickly. Forensic Chemistry offers high visibility and focused attention on the important developments that impact many scientists around the world."

"The field of forensic chemistry has grown substantially over the last few years and researchers are longing for a suitable journal which can assess the chemistry but also take legal and forensic aspects into account", said Elsevier publisher Christian Schulz. "Forensic Chemistry provides exactly this and additionally focuses on quick publication times, open data sharing and the grouping of all articles into four Technology Readiness Levels that will make the material easily accessible to readers."

The first issue of Forensic Chemistry is scheduled to be published by mid-2016. The journal is welcoming submissions. For more information and to submit an article, please visit the journal homepage: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forc.
-end-
About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions -- among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Elsevier Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey -- and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 33,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a world-leading provider of information and analytics for professional and business customers across industries. http://www.elsevier.com

Media contact

Annis Moreira
Marketing Communications Manager
Elsevier
+31 20 4852770
a.moreira@elsevier.com

Elsevier

Related Chemistry Articles:

Coordination chemistry and Alzheimer's disease
It has become evident recently that the interactions between copper and amyloid-β neurotoxically impact the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease.
Can ionic liquids transform chemistry?
Table salt is a commonplace ingredient in the kitchen, but a different kind of salt is at the forefront of chemistry innovation.
Principles for a green chemistry future
A team led by researchers from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies recently authored a paper featured in Science that outlines how green chemistry is essential for a sustainable future.
Sugar changes the chemistry of your brain
The idea of food addiction is a very controversial topic among scientists.
Reflecting on the year in chemistry
A lot can happen in a year, especially when it comes to science.
Better chemistry through tiny antennae
A research team at The University of Tokyo has developed a new method for actively controlling the breaking of chemical bonds by shining infrared lasers on tiny antennae.
Chemistry in motion
For the first time, researchers have managed to view previously inaccessible details of certain chemical processes.
Researchers enrich silver chemistry
Researchers from Russia and Saudi Arabia have proposed an efficient method for obtaining fundamental data necessary for understanding chemical and physical processes involving substances in the gaseous state.
The chemistry behind kibble (video)
Have you ever thought about how strange it is that dogs eat these dry, weird-smelling bits of food for their entire lives and never get sick of them?
Top 10 chemistry start-ups
Starting a new chemistry-based company is one part discovery, one part risk.
More Chemistry News and Chemistry Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.