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Why synthetic drugs are as scary as you think (video)

March 30, 2016

WASHINGTON, March 29, 2016 -- Synthetic drugs such as "bath salts," "K2" or "Spice" have made unsettling headlines lately, with reports of violent, erratic behavior and deaths after people have used the substances. Why are these synthesized drugs so dangerous, and why aren't there more regulations? In this week's Reactions, we answer these questions by examining the chemistry of two kinds of synthetic drugs: bath salts and synthetic marijuana. Check out the video here: https://youtu.be/83gIiBD365E.
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