Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas in China

March 31, 2010

Solid pseudopapillary tumor (SPT) of the pancreas is a rare neoplasm with a low malignant potential, usually affecting young women in the second or third decade of life. With widespread availability of high-quality imaging systems and a better understanding of its pathology, the number of cases reported in the literature has been steadily increased in recent years.

A research article to be published on March 14, 2010 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. The research team led by Dr. Yu from Zhejiang Cancer Hospital collected relatively comprehensive data which were from the published Chinese literature. It was found that SPTs was a rare indolent neoplasm that typically occurs in young females. The symptoms were non-specific, and nearly one third of all patients were asymptomatic, with the tumors found during routine physical examinations. Radiological investigations such as computed tomography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, fine needle aspiration cytology, endoscopic ultrasound scan were performed for the evaluation of SPTs,however, the misdiagnoses rate was still high in some centers. SPTs can be potentially curable by extended resections of the primary tumor mass.The prognosis is favourable even in the presence of recurrence or unresectable metastasis.In addition, the authors analized the potential relationship bewteen HBV infection and the pathogenesis of SPTs. The positive staining of Ki-67 may correlate with the malignant potential and poor outcome was also decribed.

This is a retrospective study that summarizes a considerable number of patients with solid pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas in the Chinese literature. The results are interesting and provide some detail meaningful to clinicians for the management of SPTs.
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Reference: Yu PF, Hu ZH, Wang XB, Guo JM, Cheng XD, Zhang YL, Xu Q. Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas: A review of 553 cases in the Chinese literature. World J Gastroenterol 2010; 16(10): 1209-1214 http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v16/i10/1209.htm

Correspondence to: Peng-Fei Yu, MD, Department of Abdominal Surgery, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou 310022, Zhejiang Province, China. yupengfei23@163.com Telephone: +86-571-88122018

About World Journal of Gastroenterology

World Journal of Gastroenterology (WJG), a leading international journal in gastroenterology and hepatology, has established a reputation for publishing first class research on esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, viral hepatitis, colorectal cancer, and H pylori infection and provides a forum for both clinicians and scientists. WJG has been indexed and abstracted in Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, Science Citation Index Expanded (also known as SciSearch) and Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Index Medicus, MEDLINE and PubMed, Chemical Abstracts, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Abstracts Journals, Nature Clinical Practice Gastroenterology and Hepatology, CAB Abstracts and Global Health. ISI JCR 2008 IF: 2.081. WJG is a weekly journal published by WJG Press. The publication dates are the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day of every month. WJG is supported by The National Natural Science Foundation of China, No. 30224801 and No. 30424812, and was founded with the name of China National Journal of New Gastroenterology on October 1, 1995, and renamed WJG on January 25, 1998.

About The WJG Press

The WJG Press mainly publishes World Journal of Gastroenterology.

World Journal of Gastroenterology

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