What is the association between ATG16L1 and inflammatory bowel disease?

March 31, 2010

The ATG16L1 gene is located on chromosome 2 and encodes a protein involved in the formation of autophagosomes during autophagy. Autophagy is a cytoplasmic process that keeps a cell stable. Hampe et al first identified ATG16L1 as a Crohn's disease (CD) susceptibility gene in 2007, and many other studies have arisen since then. However, the definite relationship of variants of ATG16L1 with IBD remains unclear.

A research article to be published on March 14 , 2010 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. This meta-analysis, led by Jia-Fei Cheng and his colleagues selected publications that addressed the relationship between rs2241880/T300A polymorphism of ATG16L1 and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Forty-one papers were found through the literature search, and 25 of them were included in the final analysis according to strict exclusion criteria. Each of the 25 studies included cases of CD, with various subsets of papers that considered different ethnic populations. Fourteen papers included both CD and UC cases. As to children, seven of the included studies explored the relationship between the incidence of the variant of ATG16L1 and CD, while only two studies reported cases of child-onset UC.

The researchers found that the variant of ATG16L1 was associated a higher risk for CD and UC. For child-onset IBD, this variant was related to CD but not UC. These findings suggest a role for autophagy in the development of IBD, although the exact role that ATG16L1 plays in IBD etiology is unknown. Until recently, autophagy was considered to be only a cell maintenance mechanism. However, recent research has uncovered a role for autophagy in innate and adaptive immunity, which sheds light on the potential mechanism of the correlation between this gene mutation and an increased risk for IBD.

Further exploration of the molecular and cellular basis for the observed association between ATG16L1 and IBD may expand our understanding of the pathophysiology that underlies the development of IBD.
-end-
Reference: Cheng JF, Ning YJ, Zhang W, Lu ZH, Lin L. T300A polymorphism of ATG16L1 and susceptibility to inflammatory bowel diseases: A meta-analysis. World J Gastroenterol 2010; 16(10): 1258-1266 http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v16/i10/1258.htm

Correspondence to: Lin Lin, Professor, Department of Gastroenterology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu Province, China. lin9100@yahoo.com.cn
Telephone: +86-25-83718836 Fax: +86-25-83674636

About World Journal of Gastroenterology

World Journal of Gastroenterology (WJG), a leading international journal in gastroenterology and hepatology, has established a reputation for publishing first class research on esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, viral hepatitis, colorectal cancer, and H pylori infection and provides a forum for both clinicians and scientists. WJG has been indexed and abstracted in Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, Science Citation Index Expanded (also known as SciSearch) and Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Index Medicus, MEDLINE and PubMed, Chemical Abstracts, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Abstracts Journals, Nature Clinical Practice Gastroenterology and Hepatology, CAB Abstracts and Global Health. ISI JCR 2008 IF: 2.081. WJG is a weekly journal published by WJG Press. The publication dates are the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day of every month. WJG is supported by The National Natural Science Foundation of China, No. 30224801 and No. 30424812, and was founded with the name of China National Journal of New Gastroenterology on October 1, 1995, and renamed WJG on January 25, 1998.

About The WJG Press

The WJG Press mainly publishes World Journal of Gastroenterology.

World Journal of Gastroenterology

Related Inflammatory Bowel Disease Articles from Brightsurf:

People with inflammatory bowel disease still die earlier despite increase in life
A study comparing life expectancy of people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and without found that, while life expectancy increased for both groups, people with IBD generally died sooner.

Cell therapy designed to treat inflammatory bowel disease
The UPV/EHU's NanoBioCel research group has for many years been developing systems enabling cells to be used as drugs.

Team develops wearable sensor to help people with inflammatory bowel disease
University of Texas at Dallas researchers have designed a wearable device that monitors sweat for biomarkers that could signal flare-ups of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Antibiotics associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease
Antibiotics use, particularly antibiotics with greater spectrum of microbial coverage, may be associated with an increased risk of new-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and its subtypes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

Yes, inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease are linked
A systematic review and meta-analysis that has determined there is a nine-fold increased risk of having IBD for patients with a previous diagnosis of celiac disease.

The effects of inflammatory bowel disease on pregnancy
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) -- including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis -- often affects women of childbearing age.

5 major advances in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment
Summary of five impactful studies to be presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress, a partnership of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation and the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA).

Researchers identify a possible cause and treatment for inflammatory bowel disease
In a study published online in PNAS on Jan. 20, 2020, Prof.

Does inflammatory bowel disease carry certain risks during pregnancy?
Pregnant women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are more likely to undergo delivery by Caesarean section and face certain risks during pregnancy, according to an analysis published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics.

Inhibiting a protease could improve the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease
Scientists at the CNIC and CSIC have identified a function of a protease that could be the future target of drugs to treat inflammatory bowel disease.

Read More: Inflammatory Bowel Disease News and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.