Public Forum: Japan and Early Lessons for the Nuclear Industry

March 31, 2011

A panel discussion with prominent figures in the nuclear industry will be led by Maurie Cohen, PhD, assistant professor in the department of environmental sciences at NJIT. "Panelists will look at the current status of the ongoing nuclear emergency in Japan and the emergent implications of the disaster," Cohen said. "Speakers will discuss the apparent failure of contingency planning, the technical failures at the nuclear facilities and the health implications." The public is welcome.

The event will be held Monday, April 4, 2011, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. in the Jim Wise Theater on the NJIT Campus.

Speakers include the following notable individuals.

Lee Clarke, PhD, Professor, Department of Sociology, Rutgers University, http://ur.rutgers.edu/experts/index.php?a=display&f=expert&id=1105, is an internationally-known expert on disasters and organizational and technological failures. He is the author of two books from the University of Chicago Press and editor of Research in Social Problems and Public Policy, volume Terrorism and Disaster: New Threats, New Ideas (2003).

Alexander Glaser, PhD, Assistant Professor, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, will discuss his work. It has focused on the technical aspects of nuclear-fuel-cycle technologies and policy questions related to nuclear energy and nuclear-weapon proliferation. http://www.princeton.edu/step/people/faculty/alexander-glaser/

N. Prasad Kadambi, PhD, is a nuclear safety consultant with 40 years experience in government, the private sector and academe. He is chair of the Standards Board, a governing committee of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) http://www.new.ans.org/about/committees/ . He has instituted initiatives for ANS that broke new ground within the framework of public private partnerships. He also served 26 years with the staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Jennifer Kim is advocate for NJPIRG http://www.njpirg.org/staff/jennifer-kim based in Trenton. As advocate, Kim works on a variety of issues including consumer safety, public health, and transportation.
-end-
NJIT, New Jersey's science and technology university, enrolls more than 8,900 students pursuing bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in 121 programs. The university consists of six colleges: Newark College of Engineering, College of Architecture and Design, College of Science and Liberal Arts, School of Management, College of Computing Sciences and Albert Dorman Honors College. U.S. News & World Report's 2010 Annual Guide to America's Best Colleges ranked NJIT in the top tier of national research universities. NJIT is internationally recognized for being at the edge in knowledge in architecture, applied mathematics, wireless communications and networking, solar physics, advanced engineered particulate materials, nanotechnology, neural engineering and e-learning. Many courses and certificate programs, as well as graduate degrees, are available online through the Office of Continuing Professional Education.

New Jersey Institute of Technology

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