Nav: Home

New non-surgical treatment for common, vexing eye condition

March 31, 2014

Baltimore, MD, 31 March 2014. - A new report reveals a potential breakthrough in the treatment of a common eye ailment known as pterygium (Surfer's eye) that impacts the vision, eye health, and cosmetic appearance of countless sufferers.

The newly published report shows that eye drops containing the anti-anginal drug dipyridamole (Persantin®, Cardoxin®) led to almost total disappearance of an inflamed pterygium in a 35 year old otherwise healthy woman.

Dipyridamole is a drug in use over the past 55 years to treat other disorders, but now found to have this remarkable new use.

Pterygium is a disorder in which a non-cancerous growth develops on the white conjunctiva of the eye and over time invades the cornea. In some countries it affects up to 25% of the population. As the growth spreads, patients can develop vision problems as well as significant discomfort from complications such as dry eye, inflammation, irritation, and foreign body sensation. Additionally, because of their location in the eyes, pterygia are a cause of substantial cosmetic concern for sufferers.

Until now, eye surgery has been the only curative option, aided by medications trying to lessen the disorder's symptoms. However, even after eye surgery, pterygia often recur.

The new report's lead author, Moshe Rogosnitzky, who is Co-Founder and Director of Research at the MedInsight Research Institute, discovered that administration of dipyridamole eye drops significantly reduced a pterygium and completely resolved the associated inflammation and other symptoms.

Clinical trials are now being plannedfor pterygia, pingueculae, and other common eye disorders and their complications such as dry eye and inflammation.

One particular advantage to this discovery is that dipyridamole is a widely-approved anti-thrombosis medication that has been in use for over 55 years. Its safety profile is well-established; as such, fast-track development of dipyridamole eye drops as a repurposed drug is feasible.

Moshe Rogosnitzky commented on this finding, "Pterygium and dry eye are debilitating disorders for which new safe solutions are urgently needed, and I believe dipyridamole has the potential to provide relief to sufferers of these intractable conditions.

Rogosnitzky, who specializes in finding new uses for old drugs, continued, "This is yet another example of the advantages of drug repurposing. Whereas bringing a new drug to market can take up to 17 years or more, finding a new use for an old drug with an excellent safety profile can lead to approval and availability in as little as two years."
-end-
The findings of this report and photos of the treated eye are published in Case Reports in Ophthalmology (2014; 5:pp. 98-103) on March 25, 2014.

About MedInsight® Research Institute

MedInsight® Research Institute is committed to bringing relief to those who suffer from cancer or chronic medical conditions by making doctors aware of commercially unsponsored medications, off-label uses for approved medicines, long-lost therapies and specialized tests that enable treatment to be tailored to the individual. As a U.S.-based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, MedInsight works to bridge the widening gap between medical research and medical practice. http://www.medinsight.org

MedInsight Research Institute

Related Vision Articles:

Improving the vision of self-driving vehicles
There may be a better way for autonomous vehicles to learn how to drive themselves: by watching humans.
A new model of vision
MIT researchers have developed a computer model of face processing that could reveal how the brain produces richly detailed visual representations so quickly.
Vision may be the real cause of children's problems
Do you have poor motor skills or struggle to read, write or solve math problems?
Shark and ray vision comes into focus
Until now, little has been known about the evolution of vision in cartilaginous fishes, particularly sharks and their genetic cousins, the rays.
The birth of vision, from the retina to the brain
How do neurons differentiate to become individual components of the visual system?
Tracing the evolution of vision
The function of the visual photopigment rhodopsin and its action in the retina to facilitate vision is well understood.
Going the distance: Brain cells for 3D vision discovered
Scientists at Newcastle University have discovered neurons in insect brains that compute 3D distance and direction.
A new vision for genomics in animal agriculture
Iowa State University animal scientists helped to form a blueprint to guide the next decade of animal genomics research.
Putting vision models to the test
MIT neuroscientists have performed the most rigorous testing yet of computational models that mimic the brain's visual cortex.
A new vision for neuroscience
For decades scientists have been searching for a way to watch a live broadcast of the brain.
More Vision News and Vision Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 3: Shared Immunity
More than a million people have caught Covid-19, and tens of thousands have died. But thousands more have survived and recovered. A week or so ago (aka, what feels like ten years in corona time) producer Molly Webster learned that many of those survivors possess a kind of superpower: antibodies trained to fight the virus. Not only that, they might be able to pass this power on to the people who are sick with corona, and still in the fight. Today we have the story of an experimental treatment that's popping up all over the country: convalescent plasma transfusion, a century-old procedure that some say may become one of our best weapons against this devastating, new disease.   If you have recovered from Covid-19 and want to donate plasma, national and local donation registries are gearing up to collect blood.  To sign up with the American Red Cross, a national organization that works in local communities, head here.  To find out more about the The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project, which we spoke about in our episode, including information on clinical trials or plasma donation projects in your community, go here.  And if you are in the greater New York City area, and want to donate convalescent plasma, head over to the New York Blood Center to sign up. Or, register with specific NYC hospitals here.   If you are sick with Covid-19, and are interested in participating in a clinical trial, or are looking for a plasma donor match, check in with your local hospital, university, or blood center for more; you can also find more information on trials at The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project. And lastly, Tatiana Prowell's tweet that tipped us off is here. This episode was reported by Molly Webster and produced by Pat Walters. Special thanks to Drs. Evan Bloch and Tim Byun, as well as the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.