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Nanomedicine shines light on combined force of nanomedicine and regenerative medicine

March 31, 2015

31 March, 2015 - Nanomedicine has published a special focus issue on the combined force of nanomedicine and regenerative medicine; two fields that continue to develop at a dramatic pace.

Titled 'Engineering the nanoenvironment for regenerative medicine', the issue is guest edited by Professor Matthew J. Dalby (University of Glasgow, UK, and associate editor of Nanomedicine) and Dr Manus J.P. Biggs (National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland). It comprises 9 primary research articles and 3 reviews covering topics relevant to the current translation of nanotopography and nanofunctionalization for nanoscale regenerative strategies in medicine.

Indeed, the field of 'nanoregeneration' has grown exponentially over the last 15 years, and fields of study focusing on the nanobiointerface now include nanotopographical modification, formulation of existing biomaterials and modification of the extracellular matrix, as well as the development of targeting techniques using nanoparticles.

Nanoscale platforms are becoming increasingly recognized as tools to understand biological molecules, subcellular structures and how cells and organs work. Therefore, they could have real applications in regenerative medicine and increase our knowledge of how stem cells work, or in drug discovery and cell targeting.

"The fields of nanomedicine and regenerative medicine continue to evolve at a dramatic pace, with new and exciting developments almost a daily occurrence. This special focus issue highlights the translational research, reviews current thinking and 'shines a light' on the future potential of a field where nanomedicine converges with regenerative medicine," said Michael Dowdall, Managing Commissioning Editor of Nanomedicine. "We feel this is an important subject for our readers to have a comprehensive and contextual overview of. The special focus issue helps provide this context for researchers, by framing the potential applications of nanomedicine/nanoengineering in terms of the current 'state of the art' regenerative medicine techniques."

Professor Dalby commented: "This special focus issue on nanoscale regenerative strategies focuses on basic and translational aspects of nanotopography and nanofunctionalization, and also gives perspective to future fundamental developments in the field, helping provide a future translational pipeline."

Members of RegMedNet, the online community for those working in the field of regenerative medicine, can access select articles from the special focus issue through the online platform.
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A full listing of articles included in the issue is available at: http://www.futuremedicine.com/toc/nnm/10/5

Notes to Editors:

About Nanomedicine

Nanomedicine (Impact Factor 5.824 ¬- 2013) is a uniquely medicine-focused journal, addressing the important challenges and advances in medical nanoscale-structured material and devices, biotechnology devices and molecular machine systems and nanorobotics, delivering this essential information in concise, clear and attractive article formats. The journal is a valuable information source for all players in the field - academic, industrial and clinical researchers, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, regulatory authorities and others across the scientific community.

Coverage includes:

  • Principles of nanomedicine, including basic research and theoretical applications
  • Nanotechnological advances and their potential medical applications
  • Disorders/conditions and the benefits of nanomedical tools versus traditional techniques
  • Pre-clinical testing of novel nanomedical tools
  • Diagnostic tools and applications
  • Implanted nanodevices for the prevention and treatment of disease and the alleviation of pain
  • Nanomedical tools in gene therapy for inherited diseases
  • Tissue, cell and genetic engineering involving nanomedical tools
  • Therapeutic applications of nanotechnology
  • Drug delivery using nano-particles (natural and artificial) or devices
  • Technologies already in clinical use: diagnostics, therapeutics or surgical aids
  • Prediction of adverse reactions of nanomedical technology, toxicology and safety issues
  • Ethical, regulatory and legal issues
  • Commercialization, funding and economics of nanomedical technology.

The nanomedicine field is still in its infancy, however, in the next few years there are likely to be further exciting developments across medical science, engineering, chemistry and physics. Diverse researchers working together under the nanomedicine umbrella will produce findings with potential medical uses: preventing, diagnosing and treating human diseases, as well as relieving pain. Nanomedicine will provide a critical overview of these advances as they unfold, helping to shape the future of medicine in this exciting era.

About RegMedNet

Launched in December 2014, RegMedNet is the first of a suite of online networks from Future Science Group focusing on a range of aspects in medicinal and scientific discovery and enterprise. RegMedNet is free to join for all those specializing in regenerative medicine and related fields, and mixes user-generated content with specially curated content from the community manager, as well as providing networking opportunities and peer-to-peer engagement to really drive this exciting field forward. http://www.regmednet.com

About Future Science Group

Founded in 2001, Future Science Group (FSG) is a progressive publisher focused on breakthrough medical, biotechnological, and scientific research. FSG's portfolio includes two imprints, Future Science and Future Medicine. Both publish eBooks and journals. In addition to this core publishing business, FSG develops specialist eCommunities. Key titles and sites include Bioanalysis Zone, Epigenomics,Nanomedicine and the award-winning Regenerative Medicine.

The aim of FSG is to service the advancement of clinical practice and drug research by enhancing the efficiency of communications among clinicians, researchers and decision-makers, and by providing innovative solutions to their information needs. This is achieved through a customer-centric approach, use of new technologies, products that deliver value-for-money and uncompromisingly high standards. http://www.future-science-group.com

Future Science Group

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NUS Medicine researchers can reprogramme cells to original state for regenerative medicine
Scientists from NUS Medicine have found a way to induce totipotency in embryonic cells that have already matured into pluripotency.
A new material for regenerative medicine capable to control cell immune response
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Montana (USA) proposed a new promising material for regenerative medicine for recovery of damaged tissues and blood vessels.
Optoceutics: A new technique using light for regenerative medicine
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