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First use of new ablation catheter in US offers improved atrial fibrillation treatment

March 31, 2015

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - April 1, 2015 - Dr. Daniel Melby, an investigator at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation (MHIF), performed the first atrial fibrillation ablation in the U.S. using Biosense Webster's new THERMOCOOL SMARTTOUCH® SF contact force sensing catheter as part of an FDA regulated safety trial (SMART-SF). Biosense Webster is part of the Johnson & Johnson family of companies. "The SMARTTOUCH® SF catheter is an important evolution in RF ablation technology," said Dr. Melby. "Contact force sensing combined with the more efficient irrigation design of this catheter may allow for a more effective ablation pattern while potentially reducing risk of thrombus formation and improving outcomes."

Ablation is one of the treatment options for millions of individuals who experience atrial fibrillation. During an ablation, an electrophysiologist maps the patient's heart arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm), finds the source and cauterizes the muscle to disrupt the arrhythmia. The Minneapolis Heart Institute at Abbott Northern Hospital performs hundreds of ablation procedures each year and the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation is involved with many clinical trials that target treatments for atrial fibrillation. For more information about this trial, please contact MHIF Research Coordinator Kate Schmitt, CCRC at 612-863-9291.
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The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation is dedicated to improving people's lives through the highest quality cardiovascular research and education.

* Scientific Innovation and Research -- Publishing more than 120 peer-reviewed studies each year, MHIF is a recognized research leader in the broadest range of cardiovascular medicine. Each year, cardiologists and hospitals around the world adopt MHIF protocols to save lives and improve patient care.

* Education and Outreach -- Research shows that modifying specific health behaviors can significantly reduce the risk of developing heart disease. Through community programs, screenings and presentations, MHIF educates people of all walks of life about heart health. The goal of the Foundation's community outreach is to increase personal awareness of risk factors and provide the tools necessary to help people pursue heart- healthy lifestyles.

Contact

Melissa Hanson
Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation
612-863-3628
mhanson@mhif.org
http://www.mplsheart.org

Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation

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