Nav: Home

SAGE announces travel grant winners for annual UKSG Conference

March 31, 2015

London (31 March 2015) SAGE today is delighted to announce the winners of a joint travel grant sponsorship with Springer, for the Annual 2015 UKSG Conference. The sponsorship award, awarded to 6 students and early career professionals, enables the winners to attend the 2015 UKSG Annual Conference and be an active part of the debates that are affecting the current academic landscape.

The winners of the 2015 annual travel grant are:

Students
  • Lucinda May (Manchester Metropolitan University)
  • Saoirse Reynolds (Aberystwyth University)
  • Lucy Woolhouse (University of Sheffield)

Early Career Professionals
  • Eimear Blee (Queen's University Belfast)
  • Hannah DeGroff (University of York)
  • Jennifer Wright (Cambridge University Press)

2015 marks the third consecutive year that SAGE has sponsored this award. Speaking of the grant, Jane Makoff, Marketing Director SAGE, stated that:

"As a publisher that strives for innovation in a rapidly advancing technological world, partnerships with our librarian community and supporting the facilitation of debate between publisher, scholar and librarian so that we can better support their needs, is a key commitment of SAGE's. We extend our congratulations to the scholars and look forward to meeting them at the conference."

The UKSG conference is a major event in the scholarly communications calendar and attracts around 900 delegates - librarians, publishers, content providers and intermediaries - from around the world. The 2015 Annual Conference and Exhibition will be taking place in Glasgow from the 30 March to the 1 April, for more information please click here. Come and visit us at our SAGE stands 75 and 77 throughout the event.
-end-
SAGE Founded 50 years ago by Sara Miller McCune to support the dissemination of usable knowledge and educate a global community, SAGE publishes more than 800 journals and over 800 new books each year, spanning a wide range of subject areas. A growing selection of library products includes archives, data, case studies, conference highlights and video. SAGE remains majority owned by our founder and after her lifetime will become owned by a charitable trust that secures the company's continued independence. Principal offices are located in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington DC and Boston. http://www.sagepub.com

UKSG's mission is to connect the knowledge community and encourage the exchange of ideas on scholarly communication. We are the only organisation spanning the wide range of interests and activities across the scholarly information community of librarians, publishers, intermediaries and technology vendors. Our vision is to use our breadth of knowledge and influence to facilitate an efficient information chain, a better information experience for scholars, and a world where all members of the scholarly and professional information supply chain understand each other. http://www.uksg.org

SAGE

Related Active Part Articles:

Active droplets
Using a mixture of oil droplets and hydrogel, medical active agents can be not only precisely dosed, but also continuously administered over periods of up to several days.
Keeping active or becoming more active in middle and older age linked to longer life
Keeping physically active or becoming more active during middle and older age is associated with a lower risk of death, regardless of past activity levels or existing health conditions, suggests a large UK study published by The BMJ today.
Part of the immune strategy of the strawberry plant is characterized
A University of Cordoba research group classified a gene family responsible for partial control of strawberry defense mechanisms when attacked by common pathogens in crop fields
Iconic Australian working dog may not be part dingo after all
Researchers at the University of Sydney have found no genetic evidence that the iconic Australian kelpie shares canine ancestry with a dingo, despite Australian bush myth.
What and where in the processing of body-part information
Our brain tells us where parts of the body are in space.
Ecological benefits of part-night lighting revealed
Study shows there is no difference in pollination success between part-night lighting and full darkness, highlighting the ecological benefit of switching off our street lights even for short periods in the night.
Getting older adults to be more active
What needs to happen to entice more seniors up and out of their easy chairs?
Regular exercise should be part of cancer care for all patients
Including exercise or sport as part of cancer care can significantly improve symptom management, quality of life and fitness during and after treatment, French researchers have concluded in two presentations to be reported at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich.
The rising price of Medicare Part D's 10 most costly medications
Researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California San Diego have found that the cost for the 10 'highest spend' medications in Medicare Part D -- the US federal government's primary prescription drug benefit for older citizens -- rose almost one-third between 2011 and 2015, even as the number of persons using these drugs dropped by the same amount.
Physician burnout: Resilience training is only part of the solution
Although many health systems have turned to resilience training as a solution to physician burnout, quality/safety researcher Alan Card, Ph.D., MPH, argues that such training alone is not enough.
More Active Part News and Active Part Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Clint Smith
The killing of George Floyd by a police officer has sparked massive protests nationwide. This hour, writer and scholar Clint Smith reflects on this moment, through conversation, letters, and poetry.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.