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RolyPOLY -- A unique flexible shelter produced by robotic winding of carbon fibers

March 31, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, March 31, 2016--Combine the principles of weaving with the high-tech properties of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer and the computationally driven process of robotic winding and you get rolyPOLY. The fields of design, architecture, and materials science converged to produce this 20-pound, single-occupant, prototype structure, which is described in an article in 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free for download on the 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing website until April 30, 2016.

In the article "Craft Driven Robotic Composites"), Andrew John Wit, Temple University, and Simon Kim, University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA), Mariana Ibañez, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), and Daniel Eisinger, Ball State University (Muncie, IN), discuss the concept and design development of these types of structures and their implications for creating large architectural-scale constructs. The researchers describe in detail the materials used, winding process, baking, modular steel frame assembly and disassembly, and installation.
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About the Journal

3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing is the only peer-reviewed journal focused on the rapidly moving field of 3D printing and related technologies. Led by Editor-in-Chief Skylar Tibbits Director, Self-Assembly Lab, MIT, and Founder & Principal, SJET LLC., the Journal explores emerging challenges and opportunities ranging from new developments of processes and materials, to new simulation and design tools, and informative applications and case studies. Published quarterly online with open access options and in print, the Journal spans a broad array of disciplines to address the challenges and discover new breakthroughs and trends within this groundbreaking technology. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative medical and biomedical peer-reviewed journals, including Big Data, Soft Robotics, New Space, and Tissue Engineering. Its biotechnology trade magazine GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News) was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's more than 80 journals, newsmagazines, and books is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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