Nav: Home

Northwestern Memorial Hospital recognized by CDC for innovative efforts to prevent blood clots

March 31, 2016

Northwestern Memorial Hospital was one of eight hospitals and health systems recognized by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as Healthcare-Associated Venous Thromboembolism (HA-VTE) Prevention Champions. Venous thromboemboli, or VTE, are blood clots that form deep in the body, in the lungs, or both. Northwestern Memorial was recognized for its success in implementing innovative and effective ways to prevent VTE in healthcare settings.

VTE is a serious and growing public health problem with an estimated 900,000 VTE events occurring in the U.S. each year, resulting in as many as 100,000 premature deaths. VTE-associated healthcare costs may be as high as $10 billion a year. People who are currently or recently hospitalized, recovering from surgery, or being treated for cancer are at increased risk for developing these deadly blood clots.

"Approximately half of all VTE occur in patients who are hospitalized or recovering from surgery," said Karl Y. Bilimoria, MD, MS, vice chair for quality in the department of Surgery for Northwestern Medicine and director of the Northwestern Surgical Outcomes and Quality Improvement Center. "To ensure that we were providing the best possible care for our patients, we implemented a comprehensive, multi-year initiative to prevent blood clots after surgery. We are proud to be recognized for this team effort that involved physicians, nurses, patients, process improvement engineers, quality improvement experts and our executive leadership."

Northwestern Memorial's VTE prevention success relied upon several factors, including:
  • Support from senior clinical leadership and hospital administration
  • Educational intervention among physicians and nurses to develop their skills and engage their support
  • Improvements in the electronic medical record system to advance safe and consistent practice
  • Robust collaboration among surgical and medical clinicians to define and adopt VTE prevention practices
  • Continuous monitoring of unit-specific performance by hospital leadership, clinical process owners and frontline nurse managers
  • Dedicated focus on systematic measurement and feedback, using data to drive improvement.

For more information on Northwestern Memorial's HA-VTE prevention strategies, visit http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dvt/documents/champ-fact-sheet-northwestern-il.pdf. The HA-VTE Champions are a group of eight institutions ranging from a small community hospital to some of the country's largest health systems, representing both rural and urban areas. Together, the organizations cared for more than 450,000 patients admitted to hospitals across the United States in 2014. To learn how these facilities were able to improve VTE prevention by implementing innovative, effective and sustainable strategies, visit the CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dvt/ha-vte-challenge.html.

"These challenge winners saved lives by implementing innovative VTE prevention strategies in their institutions," said CDC Director Thomas Frieden, MD, MPH. "We can all learn from their ideas and work together to protect patients from developing deadly blood clots."

The HA-VTE Prevention Challenge was launched on November 2, 2015, to find and reward hospitals, managed care organizations and hospital networks that implemented innovative and effective ways to prevent HA-VTE. CDC, along with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), is sharing these best practices with others to help strengthen VTE prevention efforts.
-end-
About Northwestern Medicine®

To learn more about Northwestern Medicine, please visit: http://news.nm.org/about-northwestern-medicine.html.

Northwestern Memorial HealthCare

Related Blood Clots Articles:

Cellular senescence is associated with age-related blood clots
Cells that become senescent irrevocably stop dividing under stress, spewing out a mix of inflammatory proteins that lead to chronic inflammation as more and more of the cells accumulate over time.
New guidance on potentially fatal blood clots published today
The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines on acute pulmonary embolism are published online today in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website.
One in five haematological cancer patients suffer blood clots or bleeding
In the years following haematological cancer, one in five survivors suffer a blood clot or bleeding which requires hospital treatment.
Targeting inflammation to better understand dangerous blood clots
Forty percent of people who develop venous thromboembolism don't know what caused it.
Impeding white blood cells in antiphospholipid syndrome reduced blood clots
A new study examined APS at the cellular level and found that two drugs reduced development of blood clots in mice affected with the condition.
Research unlocks biomechanical mystery behind deadly blood clots
Researchers at the University of Sydney have used biomechanical engineering techniques to unlock the mystery surrounding the mechanical forces that influence blood clotting.
HRT tablets associated with increased risk of blood clots
Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) tablets are associated with a higher risk of rare but serious blood clots (known as venous thromboembolism or VTE), finds a large study in The BMJ today.
HRT tablets increase risk of blood clots in women
Women who use certain types of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are at a higher risk of developing potentially life-threatening blood clots, new research has confirmed.
How and why blood clots shrink
In an article published in Nature Communications, researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine used high-powered microscopy and rheometry -- the measurement of how materials become deformed in response to applied force -- to view the blood clotting process in real time and at the cellular level.
Can height increase risk for blood clots in veins?
Risk of blood clots in the veins was associated with height, with the lowest risk in participants who were five feet tall or shorter.
More Blood Clots News and Blood Clots Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.