Nav: Home

Improved patient outcomes linked to specific health IT resources in hospitals

March 31, 2016

OLUMBIA, Mo. (March 31, 2016) --The number of health information technology venders has increased from 60 to more than 1,000 since 2008. However, many scholars have expressed concerns that such services are flooding the market without proper development, making hospitals more susceptible to adopting dysfunctional IT systems that are not geared toward the original goal of improving patient care. Now, a University of Missouri School of Medicine researcher has identified three IT capabilities hospitals should have that lead to higher rates of employee productivity and flexibility. The researcher said greater employee productivity leads to improved patient care in U.S. hospitals.

"Health information technologies have a great potential to improve patient safety and reduce cost of care," said Naresh Khatri, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Health Management and Informatics at the MU School of Medicine. "However, the benefits of these services have remained far from realized due to a lack of proper implementation. This study found that specific IT capabilities boosted employee efforts and flexibility, leading to improved patient care."

Khatri and his research team surveyed representatives from more than 450 hospitals across the U.S. The team asked questions related to hospitals' IT capabilities, quality of patient care and the productivity and flexibility of their employees, with "flexibility" defined as employees' being willing to take on increasing workloads during challenging times.

The team used the survey answers to test whether the relationship of certain IT capabilities and the quality of patient care delivered could be controlled by employee productivity. The researchers found that certain IT capabilities had significant positive correlations with employee productivity, which in turn improved the quality of patient care in U.S. hospitals.

Khatri said the three IT capabilities U.S. hospitals needed for more productive employees include having a competent and visionary chief information officer, an IT infrastructure designed to develop IT applications that improve patient care and business processes, and on-site IT professionals with expertise developing cost-effective IT programs that support clinical and business needs of the organization.

"To deliver exemplary care, health care workers need technologies that can support them in their interactions with patients," Khatri said. "This means moving from clinician-centric to patient-centric IT models."

Overall, Khatri's study suggests that hospitals with greater IT capabilities may get more out of their IT investments because they can identify more appropriate, potent and cost-effective health information technologies that can be deployed more effectively.

Khatri's study, "Effective Implementation of Electronic Medical Records and Health Information Technologies in U.S. Hospitals," recently was published in Health Care Management Review.
-end-


University of Missouri-Columbia

Related Patient Care Articles:

Do ER caregivers' on-the-job emotions affect patient care?
Doctors and nurses in emergency departments at four academic centers and four community hospitals in the Northeast reported a wide range of emotions triggered by patients, hospital resources and societal factors, according to a qualitative study led by a University of Massachusetts Amherst social psychologist.
Hospitality, not medical care, drives patient satisfaction
Patients' ratings of hospitals and willingness to recommend them have almost no correlation to the quality of medical care provided or to patient survival rates, according to new Cornell University research.
Pharmacists provide patient value in team-based care
As part of an innovative model being used at UNT Health Science Center, Dr.
When the cardiology patient ends up in the oncology care ward
If you end up needing to go to the hospital, often times you're hoping to get a bed without having to wait hours, but a new study shows you may want to wait a little longer, so that you are placed in the best ward for your needs.
Could artificial intelligence improve patient care in the NHS?
The adoption of artificial intelligence in the diagnosis and prognosis of disease could help to extend people's lives whilst providing significant savings for the NHS.
Enhanced research reporting method to improve patient care
Patients could benefit from improved care and outcomes thanks to new research guidance developed as part of a University of Stirling-led study.
Mandate patient access to primary care medical records
Canada's provincial governments should mandate patient access to their electronic medical records, argue authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Dental checklist of bad practice has patient care at its heart
Dental experts have drawn up a definitive list of never events -- scenarios that patients should never face -- in a bid to ensure excellent patient care worldwide.
Transforming patient health care and well-being through lighting
The world of health care is changing rapidly and there is increased interest in the role that light and lighting can play in improving health outcomes for patients and providing healthy work environments for staff, according to many researchers.
New research on why GPs quit patient care
The research aimed to identify factors influencing GPs' decisions about whether or not to remain in direct patient care, and what might help to retain them in the role.
More Patient Care News and Patient Care Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.