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'Revolutionary future' for contact lenses -- drug delivery, disease monitoring and more

March 31, 2016

March 31, 2016 - Imagine contact lenses that can deliver medicines directly to the eye, slow progression of nearsightedness in children, or monitor glucose levels in patients with diabetes. Those are some of the emerging advances in contact lens technology reported in the April special issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

The special issue on "Revolutionary Future Uses of Contact Lenses" presents original research and reviews on proposed new uses for contact lenses. Taking advantage of new materials and technologies, these ideas go far beyond the traditional use of contact lenses for vision correction, offering potential new treatments for eye diseases, along with new approaches to monitoring of medical conditions.

New Technologies Open Exciting New Uses for Contact Lenses

The special issue was assembled by an international expert panel, led by Lyndon Jones, PhD, FCOptom, of University of Waterloo, Ont., Canada. It features 13 papers on new and emerging applications--some still under development, some already available--for contact lens technology:
  • Slowing progression of myopia. With rising rates of nearsightedness (myopia) in children worldwide, there is growing interest in the use of contact lenses to prevent or slow progression of this vision defect. Two original research studies suggest that lasting reductions in myopia progression may be possible even with some currently available contact lenses. In the future, lens designs developed specifically for this purpose may be even more effective.
  • Drug and stem cell delivery. New technologies such as "molecular imprinting" have renewed interest in the possibility of using contact lenses to deliver medications directly to the eye over a period of days to weeks. While many challenges remain, this approach could lead to improved treatments for ocular diseases, achieving higher drug levels in the eye itself. Contact lenses are even being evaluated a new approach to stem cell therapy for patients with ocular surface diseases.
  • Contact lens 'biosensors.' New technologies may enable the development of contact lenses containing biosensors to monitor patient health. For example, a device to monitor changes in intraocular pressure in patients with or at risk of glaucoma is commercially available now. The special issue also includes a report on biosensing contact lenses that can measure glucose levels in the tear film of the eye, which may one day provide a new approach to continuous monitoring in patients with diabetes.
  • New approaches to vision correction. Meanwhile, researchers are still working on new designs to further improve vision correction with contact lenses. Studies in the special issue report promising results with new approaches to extending depth of vision for patients with aging-related vision loss (presbyopia) and benefits of "centrally red-tinted contact lenses" for patients with degenerative retinal diseases or extreme light sensitivity (photophobia).

Other technologies in earlier stages of development include accommodating contact lenses capable of changing change focus, "wearable displays" using contact lenses, and lenses with "photonic modulation" for treatment of seasonal affective disorder. "The advances in contact lens technology, especially imaging and new biocompatible materials, has made such possibilities a reality," comments Anthony Adams, OD, PhD, Associate Editor of Optometry and Vision Science. "Researchers are already proposing solutions to the clinical and research challenges posed by these revolutionary new uses of contact lenses, going well beyond vision correction."
-end-
Click here to read this special issue.

About Optometry and Vision Science

Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry, is the most authoritative source for current developments in optometry, physiological optics, and vision science. This frequently cited monthly scientific journal has served primary eye care practitioners for more than 75 years, promoting vital interdisciplinary exchange among optometrists and vision scientists worldwide.

About the American Academy of Optometry

Founded in 1922, the American Academy of Optometry is committed to promoting the art and science of vision care through lifelong learning. All members of the Academy are dedicated to the highest standards of optometric practice through clinical care, education or research.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information services. Professionals in the areas of legal, business, tax, accounting, finance, audit, risk, compliance and healthcare rely on Wolters Kluwer's market leading information-enabled tools and software solutions to manage their business efficiently, deliver results to their clients, and succeed in an ever more dynamic world.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2015 annual revenues of €4.2 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, and employs over 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands. Wolters Kluwer shares are listed on Euronext Amsterdam (WKL) and are included in the AEX and Euronext 100 indices. Wolters Kluwer has a sponsored Level 1 American Depositary Receipt program. The ADRs are traded on the over-the-counter market in the U.S. (WTKWY).

For more information about our products and organization, visit http://www.wolterskluwerhealth.com, follow @WKHealth or @Wolters_Kluwer on Twitter, like us on Facebook, follow us on LinkedIn, or follow WoltersKluwerComms on YouTube.

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