Next generation perovskite solar cells with new world-record performance

March 31, 2017

A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has presented a new cost-efficient way to produce inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs) which sets a new world-record efficiency performance, in particular photostability. The research team envisions that this method and platform will significantly contribute to accelerate the commercialization of PCSs.

This breakthrough comes from a research, conducted by Distinguished Professor Sang-Il Seok of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST in collaboration with Dr. Seong Sik Shin and Dr. Jun Hong Noh of Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT). Their results, published online in the March issue of the prestigious journal Science, has emerged as the most promising candidate for the next generation high efficiency solar cell technology.

PSCs are made of a mixture of organic molecules and inorganic elements within a single crystalline structure, that together capture light and convert it into electricity. It is an unique crystal structures, consisting of two cations and one anion. They can be fabricated easily and cheaply than silicon-based solar cells, and on a flexible and rigid substrate. Moreover, PSCs reaching a photovoltaic efficiency of 22.1%, comparable to that of single crystalline silicon solar cells (25%), have been attracted much attention as the next-generation solar cells.

Professor Seok has led PSC technology as top scientist in the field. This achievement is based on the previous works (new architecture, process and composition for PSCs) by Professor Sang-Il Seok.

In this study, the research team reported the fabrication of PSCs satisfying both high efficiency (21.2%) and high photostability of the perovskite solar cells with photoelectrode materials (Lanthanum (La)-doped BaSnO3 (LBSO)) synthesized by a very novel method under very mild conditions (below 200°C). They used methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) peorvskite materials for PSCs.

Photostability refers to the ability to withstand exposure to light without a serios degradation. This new material, presented by Professor Seok's research team also retain 93% of its initial performance after 1,000 hours of exposure to sunlight. The synthesis of the photoelectrode material can also proceed at less than 200 ?, which is much lower than that of conventional (high temperature over 900 ?), making fabrication much easier.

In the study, the research team has also proposed a new solar cell manufacturing methodology, entitled 'Hot-Pressing Method'. This method tightly adheres two objects by applying temperature and pressure. It allows the production of low-cost, high efficiency and stable perovskite solar cells.

"This study combines the newly-synthesized photoelectrode material and the hot-pressing method to lower the manufacturing cost to less than half of the existing silicon solar cells," says Professor Seok, corresponding author of the paper. "This study helped us realize PSCs with a steady-state power conversion efficiency of 21.2% and excellent photostability."

He adds, "This achievement, realized by the unique technology of domestic researchers, has surpassed the conventional low-efficiency and stability limit of next-generation solar cell technology."
-end-
The study has been supported by Global Frontier R&D Program for Multiscale Energy System, Climate Change Program, and Wearable Platform Materials Technology Center through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning.

Journal Reference

Seong Sik Shin, et al., "Colloidally prepared La-doped BaSnO3 electrodes for efficient, photostable perovskite solar cells," Science, (2017).

Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)

Related Silicon Articles from Brightsurf:

Single photons from a silicon chip
Quantum technology holds great promise: Quantum computers are expected to revolutionize database searches, AI systems, and computational simulations.

For solar boom, scrap silicon for this promising mineral
Cornell University engineers have found that photovoltaic wafers in solar panels with all-perovskite structures outperform photovoltaic cells made from state-of-the-art crystalline silicon, as well as perovskite-silicon tandem cells, which are stacked pancake-style cells that absorb light better.

Surprisingly strong and deformable silicon
Researchers at ETH have shown that tiny objects can be made from silicon that are much more deformable and stronger than previously thought.

A leap in using silicon for battery anodes
Scientists have come up with a novel way to use silicon as an energy storage ingredient.

Flexible thinking on silicon solar cells
Combining silicon with a highly elastic polymer backing produces solar cells that have record-breaking stretchability and high efficiency.

No storm in a teacup -- it's a cyclone on a silicon chip
University of Queensland researchers have combined quantum liquids and silicon-chip technology to study turbulence for the first time, opening the door to new navigation technologies and improved understanding of the turbulent dynamics of cyclones and other extreme weather.

Black silicon can help detect explosives
Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, and Melbourne Center for Nanofabrication developed an ultrasensitive detector based on black silicon.

2D antimony holds promise for post-silicon electronics
Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering are searching for alternative materials to silicon with semiconducting properties that could form the basis for an alternative chip.

Silicon technology boost with graphene and 2D materials
In a review published in Nature, ICFO researchers and collaborators report on the current state, challenges, opportunities of graphene and 2D material integration in Silicon technology.

Light and sound in silicon chips: The slower the better
Acoustics is a missing dimension in silicon chips because acoustics can complete specific tasks that are difficult to do with electronics and optics alone.

Read More: Silicon News and Silicon Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.