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Surgical considerations for tracheostomy during COVID-19 pandemic

March 31, 2020

What The Viewpoint Says: Lessons learned from the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic may help reduce the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS- CoV-2), the cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), to health care workers performing open tracheostomies, a surgical procedure to open an airway that may be required for many patients with COVID-19.

Authors: Woei Shyang Loh, M.B.B.S., of the National University of Singapore, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2020.0764)

Editor's Note: Please see the articles for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflicts of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

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Media advisory: The full article is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaoto.2020.0764?guestAccessKey=7f332b4b-6ee2-4fdd-8e72-2daf267abd47&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=033120
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JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery

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