Research shows high doses of acetaminophen clear rapidly and consistently from bloodstream

April 01, 2003

Ft. Washington, PA (April 1, 2003) -- Acetaminophen, the medicine in Tylenol®, clears rapidly and completely from the bloodstream even in doses as high as twice the daily recommended dose, according to new research presented at the 42nd annual meeting of the Society of Toxicology recently in Salt Lake City.

"Our objective was to take what we already knew about the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen and go a step further," explained lead investigator Cathy K. Gelotte, PhD, Executive Director, Medical and Regulatory Product Development, McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals. "We wanted to see if acetaminophen is cleared at the same rate when we increased dosage beyond the recommended maximum adult daily dose of 4 g/day to 8 g/day. This study demonstrates how the body handles a higher dose and may be useful data for physicians."

The study, a double-blinded, placebo-controlled design, examined the pharmacokinetics of three dosing regimens: 4 g/day, 6 g/day, and 8 g/day. A total of 36 subjects were divided into two groups. Group I included 6 patients on placebo and 12 on acetaminophen taking 4 g/day then 6 g/day. Group II included 6 patients on placebo and 12 patients on acetaminophen taking 4 g/day then taking 8 g/day. Regimens were continued for three consecutive days, with blood sampling during the first and last dose of each daily regimen.

"Analysis of plasma acetaminophen levels showed that doses as high as 8 g/day, or twice the maximum daily recommended dose, did not accumulate and the drug was consistently cleared from the bloodstream," said Dr. Gelotte. "Moreover, it is important to note that liver enzyme values for all subjects, regardless of whether they were on the 4-, 6-, or 8 g/day regimen, stayed within normal limits throughout the study."

Dr. Gelotte emphasized that this study was undertaken to learn more about the pharmacokinetic profile of acetaminophen. It was not intended to explore the potential for increasing the recommended daily dosage of acetaminophen.

"It is important that consumers continue to adhere to the recommended daily dosage of no more than 4 g of acetaminophen per day, as listed on the product label," said Dr. Gelotte.

The research was conducted by McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals, a division of McNeil-PPC, Inc., headquartered in Ft. Washington, PA that markets products such as Tylenol®, Imodium®, St. Joseph®, Concerta® (methylphenidate) for ADHD and Motrin®.
-end-


Jitsu Public Relations

Related Acetaminophen Articles from Brightsurf:

A pain reliever that alters perceptions of risk
While acetaminophen is helping you deal with your headache, it may also be making you more willing to take risks, a new study suggests.

Research shows ibuprofen does not hinder bone fracture healing in children
Doctors have traditionally avoided prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen to patients with fractures.

Le Bonheur Children's Hospital trial: Intravenous indomethacin more effective for hsPDAs
Le Bonheur and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center neonatologists, led by Jennifer M.

A prescription for the pain of rejection: Acetaminophen and forgiveness
A study, published recently in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine may have found an antidote to heartbreak -- forgiveness combined with acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol.

UTHealth's Cynthia Ju awarded NIH grants for liver injury research
Tiny solutions are being sought for big liver problems by a scientist at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Study examines fetal exposure to acetaminophen, risk of childhood ADHD, ASD
Umbilical cord blood samples were used to examine an association between fetal exposure to acetaminophen and risk of childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities in a group of nearly 1,000 mother-child pairs.

NIH-funded study suggests acetaminophen in pregnancy linked to higher risk of ADHD, autism
Exposure to acetaminophen in the womb may increase a child's risk for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality.

OHIO study: Acetaminophen can reduce positive empathy for others
A new study by an Ohio University faculty member showed that acetaminophen limited positive empathy a person has for others while taking it.

Scientists find new therapy target for drug-induced liver failure
Acetaminophen -- a commonly used pain reliever and fever reducer -- is the leading cause of quickly developing, or acute, liver failure in the U.S.

Acetaminophen may increase stroke risk for those with diabetes
Surprisingly, we are only now coming to understand how acetaminophen works -- and recent research shows that we may need to develop a better understanding of the need for caution when using acetaminophen, especially when it comes to avoiding some of the risks associated with its use.

Read More: Acetaminophen News and Acetaminophen Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.