Nav: Home

Mental health disorders rife in post-conflict areas

April 01, 2019

A new study has found that 58% of people displaced following the civil war in Sri Lanka have suffered mental health problems.

Researchers conducted interviews with around 1,000 displaced adults at 25 hospitals across Northern Sri Lanka. They screened for a range of mental health disorders, such as anxiety, depression, and PTSD.

Around 83% reported they had not seen a mental health specialist in the previous three months, despite 58% reporting having mental health disorders.

The study also found unemployment and low education levels were factors that contributed to poor mental health, while women were also found to be more likely than men to suffer disorders.

The Sri Lankan Civil War (1983-2009) was an armed conflict between the Tamal Tigers and the Sri Lankan government as the Tamal Tigers attempted to create an independent state in the north and the east of the island. Approximately 80-100,000 were killed and 500,000 were displaced.

The project was the first to review mental health issues after the war, and found that there are significant unmet mental health needs in the region.

Dr Shannon Doherty, Senior Lecturer at Anglia Ruskin University and lead researcher in this project, said: "In the aftermath of conflict, physical injuries can be prioritised over serious mental health issues. We found that a worrying number of people in Sri Lanka have suffered with disorders and had not had access to appropriate treatment.

"In the second phase of our project, we aim to provide new approaches to offer mental health support to the victims of the civil war. We hope that it will help to resolve the crisis in Sri Lanka, and be applicable in future to other areas of conflict."

The paper was published in the journal BMC Psychiatry.
-end-


Anglia Ruskin University

Related Conflict Articles:

Do we trust artificial intelligence agents to mediate conflict? Not entirely
We may listen to facts from Siri or Alexa, or directions from Google Maps or Waze, but would we let a virtual agent enabled by artificial intelligence help mediate conflict among team members?
Tension around autonomy increases family conflict at end of life
Conflict within families can be stressful and confusing, and it can lead to feelings of sadness.
Coca and conflict: the factors fuelling Colombian deforestation
Deforestation in Colombia has been linked to armed conflict and forests' proximity to coca crops, the plant from which cocaine is derived.
Global burden of mental health in conflict settings
People living in countries that have experienced armed conflict are five times more likely to develop anxiety or depression, a University of Queensland research collaboration has found.
Mental health disorders rife in post-conflict areas
A new study has found that 58 percent of people displaced following the civil war in Sri Lanka have suffered mental health problems.
Climate change increases potential for conflict and violence
Images of extensive flooding or fire-ravaged communities help us see how climate change is accelerating the severity of natural disasters.
AI systems shed light on root cause of religious conflict
Artificial intelligence can help us to better understand the causes of religious violence and to potentially control it, according to a new Oxford University collaboration.
Hugs may help protect against conflict-related distress
Receiving hugs may buffer against deleterious changes in mood associated with interpersonal conflict, according to a study published Oct.
End of Colombia conflict may bring new threats to ecosystems
The end of a 52-year internal conflict could spell trouble for the second most biodiverse country in the world.
Drought, conflict and migration in Kenya
A new study is the first to use a nationwide survey representing an entire country in sub-Saharan Africa to find connections between droughts, migration and violence.
More Conflict News and Conflict Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.