2008 Signature Genomic Laboratories Travel Award presented

April 02, 2008

Madhuri R. Hegde, PhD, FACMG was honored as the 2008 recipient of the Signature Genomic Laboratories Travel Award at the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) 2008 Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting in Phoenix, AZ. Dr. Hegde is Assistant Professor, Department of Human Genetics and Director of the DNA Diagnostic Laboratory at Emory University School of Medicine.

New in 2008, the Signature Genomics Travel Award is given to a selected student, trainee or junior faculty ACMG member whose abstract submission was chosen as a platform presentation during the 2008 ACMG Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting. The program committee selects the Travel Award recipient based on scientific merit. In recognition of the selected presentation, Signature Genomics covers the travel costs for the recipient to the ACMG meeting.

"The American College of Medical Genetics Foundation is grateful to Signature Genomics for their generous support of up-and-coming medical genetic researchers through the new Signature Genomics Travel Award," said R. Rodney Howell, MD, FACMG, president of the ACMGF.

"Signature supports the recognition of outstanding young researchers in the field of medical genetics, "said Lisa G. Shaffer, PhD, president and CEO of Signature Genomics. "We are proud to be sponsoring this award."
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About the American College of Medical Genetics

Founded in 1991, the American College of Medical Genetics (www.acmg.net) advances the practice of medical genetics by providing education, resources and a voice for more than 1400 biochemical, clinical, cytogenetic, medical and molecular geneticists, genetic counselors and other health care professionals committed to the practice of medical genetics. ACMG's activities include the development of laboratory and practice standards and guidelines, advocating for quality genetic services in health care and in public health, and promoting the development of methods to diagnose, treat and prevent genetic disease. Genetics in Medicine, published monthly, is the official ACMG peer-reviewed journal. ACMG's website (www.acmg.net) offers a variety of resources including Policy Statements, Practice Guidelines, Educational Resources, and a Medical Geneticist Locator. The educational and public health programs of the American College of Medical Genetics are dependent upon charitable gifts from corporations, foundations, and individuals. The American College of Medical Genetics Foundation is a 501 (3)(c) not-for-profit organization dedicated to funding the College's diverse efforts.

About Signature Genomic Laboratories

Signature Genomic Laboratories, with its proprietary SignatureChip®, is the leader in providing microarray-based chromosome analysis. Signature's worldwide client base includes clinical geneticists, neurologists, pediatricians, neonatologists, obstetricians, and the research community. Additional information about Signature is available at www.signaturegenomics.com.

American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics

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