Nav: Home

Verifying that sorghum is a new safe grain for people with celiac disease

April 03, 2013

Strong new biochemical evidence exists showing that the cereal grain sorghum is a safe food for people with celiac disease, who must avoid wheat and certain other grains, scientists are reporting. Their study, which includes molecular evidence that sorghum lacks the proteins toxic to people with celiac disease, appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Paola Pontieri and colleagues explain that those gluten proteins, present in wheat and barley, trigger an immune reaction in people with celiac disease that can cause abdominal pain and discomfort, constipation, diarrhea and other symptoms. The only treatment is lifelong avoidance of gluten. Sorghum, they note, has emerged as an alternative grain for people with celiac disease. In Western countries, sorghum traditionally has been an animal feed. But in Africa and India, it long has been a food for people. Recently, U.S. farmers have begun producing sorghum hybrids that are a white grain, known as "food-grade" sorghum. The researchers set out to make a detailed molecular determination of whether sorghum contains those toxic gluten proteins.

They describe evidence from an analysis of the recently published sorghum genome, the complete set of genes in the plant, and other sources, that verify the absence of gluten proteins. The authors also report that sorghum has high nutritional value. "Food-grade sorghums should be considered as an important option for all people, especially celiac patients," the report concluded.

-end-

The authors acknowledge funding from the Regione Campania, the Istituto Banco di Napoli - Fondazione and the Compagnia di San Paolo.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 163,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us: TwitterFacebook

American Chemical Society
Infections in early life associated with increased risk for Celiac disease
Infections during infancy are associated with increased risk for gluten intolerance (celiac disease) later on.
ImmusanT publishes positive data from Phase 1 trials of Nexvax2 in celiac disease patients
ImmusanT announces the publication of positive data from Phase 1 clinical trials of the Nexvax2 therapeutic vaccine in celiac disease patients in The Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
Gluten-free diet not recommended for people without celiac disease
Long term dietary intake of gluten among people without celiac disease is not associated with risk of coronary heart disease -- and restricting gluten may result in a low intake of whole grains, which are associated with cardiovascular benefits, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
A viral explanation for celiac disease
An asymptomatic infection may play a role in facilitating celiac disease, a new study in mice reveals.
Seemingly innocuous virus can trigger celiac disease
Infection with reovirus, a common but otherwise harmless virus, can trigger the immune system response to gluten that leads to celiac disease, according to new research from the University of Chicago and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
Evidence insufficient to screen for celiac disease
The US Preventive Services Task Force has concluded that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic persons.
Gluten-free diet may not reduce intestinal damage in all children with celiac disease
In surprising findings, researchers from MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) and Boston Children's Hospital (BCH) have discovered that nearly one in five children with celiac disease sustained persistent intestinal damage, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet.
Twenty percent of children with celiac disease do not heal on a gluten-free diet
Even after a year on a gluten-free diet, nearly 20 percent of children with celiac disease continue to have intestinal abnormalities (enteropathy) on repeat biopsies, reports a study in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.
New research delimits the possible causes of celiac disease
The amount of gluten could be a more important clue than breast-feeding or the timing of the introduction of gluten for continued research into the causes of celiac disease (gluten intolerance).
Aberrant epigenetic regulation behind the intestinal symptoms in celiac disease
Researchers at the University of Tampere discovered a regulation mechanism governing the intestinal homeostasis.

Best Science Podcasts 2017

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2017. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.

Now Playing: Radiolab

Truth Trolls
Today, a third story of folks relentlessly searching for the truth. But this time, the truth seekers are an unlikely bunch... internet trolls.


Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking School
For most of modern history, humans have placed smaller humans in institutions called schools. But what parts of this model still work? And what must change? This hour, TED speakers rethink education.TED speakers include teacher Tyler DeWitt, social entrepreneur Sal Khan, international education expert Andreas Schleicher, and educator Linda Cliatt-Wayman.