Statin intolerance objectively identified in patients

April 03, 2016

Sunday, April 3, 2016, Chicago: In the first major trial of its kind, Cleveland Clinic researchers used a blinded rechallenge with atorvastatin or placebo to objectively confirm the presence of muscle-related symptoms in patients with a history of intolerance to multiple statins and found that evolocumab (a PCSK9 inhibitor) was a more effective option to lower cholesterol than ezetimibe in these patients.

The double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial was designed with two stages: The research is being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session and simultaneously published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"Statin intolerance has been a very challenging clinical problem," said Steven Nissen, M.D., chairman of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic. "The study showed that PCSK9 inhibitors can significantly lower cholesterol in patients with documented statin intolerance, providing an effective treatment for these difficult to manage patients."

The GAUSS-3 trial enrolled 511 patients with very high levels of LDL cholesterol - averaging more than 210 mg/dL ¬¬- and with a history of muscle-related statin intolerance. More than 80% of participants had previously reported intolerance to three or more statins. The study showed that 42.6 percent of these patients reported muscle pain or weakness on atorvastatin, but not placebo, and 26.5 percent on the placebo, but not atorvastatin.

Those who demonstrated statin intolerance only on atorvastatin were randomized to two alternative treatments to lower LDL cholesterol - evolocumab or ezetimibe. On average, patients showed a 52.8 percent reduction on evolocumab compared with 16.7 percent reduction with ezetimibe. The PCSK9 inhibitor evolocumab was more effective, but had a similar incidence of muscle-related adverse effects compared with ezetimibe.

Left untreated, patients with high levels of LDL cholesterol are at an increased risk of heart disease. Statins are the most effective drug currently available to lower LDL, but 5-105 of patients report they are unable to tolerate statins, due to muscle pain or weakness. Statin intolerance was previously diagnosed primarily by patient complaints since there exist no blood tests to document muscle-related stain intolerance.

Evolocumab, a proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor, is an injectable non-statin cholesterol-lowering drug self-administered by the patients once per month. Ezetimibe, used as the control in the trial, lowers LDL by decreasing the absorption of cholesterol in the small intestine. In the trial, both drugs rarely induced muscle symptoms, leading to discontinuation, which occurred in one patient given evolocumab and five patients given ezetimibe.
-end-
The study was funded by Amgen. Dr. Nissen has served as a consultant for many pharmaceutical companies and has overseen clinical trials for Amgen, AstraZeneca, Cerenis, Eli Lilly, Novartis, Novo Nordisk, The Medicines Company, Orexigen, Takeda and Pfizer. However, he does not accept honoraria, consulting fees or other compensation from commercial entities.

About Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. Located in Cleveland, Ohio, it was founded in 1921 by four renowned physicians with a vision of providing outstanding patient care based upon the principles of cooperation, compassion and innovation. Cleveland Clinic has pioneered many medical breakthroughs, including coronary artery bypass surgery and the first face transplant in the United States. U.S.News & World Report consistently names Cleveland Clinic as one of the nation's best hospitals in its annual "America's Best Hospitals" survey. More than 3,000 full-time salaried physicians and researchers and 11,000 nurses represent 120 medical specialties and subspecialties. The Cleveland Clinic health system includes a main campus near downtown Cleveland, eight community hospitals, more than 90 northern Ohio outpatient locations, including 18 full-service family health centers, Cleveland Clinic Florida, the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas, Cleveland Clinic Canada, and Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi. In 2014, there were 5.9 million outpatient visits throughout the Cleveland Clinic health system and 152,500 hospital admissions. Patients came for treatment from every state and 147 countries. Visit us at http://www.clevelandclinic.org. Follow us at http://www.twitter.com/ClevelandClinic.

Editor's Note: Cleveland Clinic News Service is available to provide broadcast-quality interviews and B-roll upon request.

Contact:

Tora Vinci, 216.339.4277, vinciv@ccf.org

Andrea Pacetti, 216.316.3040, pacetta@ccf.org

Cleveland Clinic

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