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Industry experts discuss advantages & risks of shifting data analytics to the cloud

April 04, 2017

New Rochelle, April 4, 2017--Thought leaders in both cloud computing and big data examine the factors driving increasing numbers of companies to move their enterprises to the cloud, explore the synergy between the cloud and notebooks, and debate whether the cloud is able to provide the level of information security needed by enterprises in an insightful Expert Panel Discussion published in Big Data, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Big Data website.

In the article entitled "Big Data and the Cloud--Data Analytics, Security, and Notebooks," Moderator Edmund Wilder-James, Silicon Valley Data Science (Mountain View, CA), leads an outstanding panel of industry experts comprised of the following participants: Caroline McCrory, Microsoft (Redmond, WA), Travis Oliphant, Continuum Analytics (Austin, TX), and David Tishgart, Cloudera (Austin, TX). Their discussion covers the opportunities and advantages companies have to gain by moving their data analytics activities to the cloud, including the potential for cost savings, improved management of analytics workloads, and more efficient use of companies' IT resources.

"Every business and IT executive should read this article," says Big Data Editor-in-Chief Vasant Dhar, Professor at the Stern School of Business and the Center for Data Science at New York University. "The discussion clarifies when and why analytics in the cloud make sense and the issues businesses are encountering as they deal with or take advantage of big data. The cloud enables new kinds of possibilities, including inexpensive experimentation that allows businesses to configure 'best fit' solutions that satisfy their needs."
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About the Journal

Big Data, published quarterly online with open access options and in print, facilitates and supports the efforts of researchers, analysts, statisticians, business leaders, and policymakers to improve operations, profitability, and communications within their organizations. Spanning a broad array of disciplines focusing on novel big data technologies, policies, and innovations, the Journal brings together the community to address the challenges and discover new breakthroughs and trends living within this information. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Big Data website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative medical and biomedical peer-reviewed journals, including OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, Journal of Computational Biology, New Space, and 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's more than 80 journals, newsmagazines, and books is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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