Nav: Home

Administration of steroid to extremely preterm infants not associated with adverse effects on neurod

April 04, 2017

The administration of low-dose hydrocortisone to extremely preterm infants was not associated with any adverse effects on neurodevelopmental outcomes at 2 years of age, according to a study published by JAMA.

Early low-dose hydrocortisone treatment in very preterm infants has been reported to improve survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia (a form of chronic lung disease), but its safety with regard to neurodevelopment remains to be assessed. Olivier Baud, M.D., Ph.D., of Robert Debre Children's Hospital, Paris, and colleagues analyzed data from the PREMILOC trial, in which infants born between 24 0/7 weeks and 27 6/7 weeks of gestation and before 24 hours of postnatal age were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or low-dose hydrocortisone injection.

Of neonates screened, 523 were assigned to hydrocortisone (n = 256) or placebo (n = 267) and 406 survived to 2 years of age. A total of 379 patients (93 percent) were evaluated at a median corrected age of 22 months. The researchers found no statistically significant difference in patients without neurodevelopmental impairment (73 percent in the hydrocortisone group vs 70 percent in the placebo group), with mild neurodevelopmental impairment (20 percent in the hydrocortisone group vs 18 percent in the placebo group), or with moderate to severe neurodevelopmental impairment (7 percent in the hydrocortisone group vs 11 percent in the placebo group). The incidence of cerebral palsy or other major neurological impairments was not significantly different between groups.

"Further randomized studies are needed to provide definitive assessment of the neurodevelopmental safety of hydrocortisone in extremely preterm infants," the authors write.
-end-
(doi:10.1001/jama.2017.2692; the study is available pre-embargo at the For the Media website)

Editor's Note: Please see the articles for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

The JAMA Network Journals

Related Placebo Articles:

The placebo effect can mend a broken heart too, CU Boulder study shows
Feeling heartbroken from a recent breakup? Just believing you're doing something to help yourself get over your ex can influence brain regions associated with emotional regulation and lessen the perception of pain.
Successful insomnia treatment may require nothing more than a placebo
A new study published in Brain indicates that successful treatment for insomnia may not actually require complicated neurofeedback (direct training of brain functions).
Placebo and valium are equally effective for acute lower back pain in the ER
Emergency patients treated with naproxen and placebo had outcomes as good as or better than patients treated with naproxen and diazepam (trade name Valium) for acute lower back pain, according to the results of a double-blind, randomized clinical trial published last week in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('Diazepam Is No Better Than Placebo When Added to Naproxen for Acute Low Back Pain').
Evaluation of recombinant antithrombin vs. placebo in preterm preeclampsia
Researchers with the PRESERVE-1 Study Group University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston -- McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas, and Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn., present findings of a study titled Randomized double-blind placebo controlled evaluation of the safety and efficacy of recombinant Antithrombin versus placebo in preterm preeclampsia.
Exploiting the placebo effect can improve recovery of heart surgery patients
Exploiting the placebo effect significantly improved the recovery of patients undergoing heart surgery according to new research published in the open access journal BMC Medicine.
More Placebo News and Placebo Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...