Nav: Home

HZB contributions to special edition on ultrafast dynamics with X-ray methods

April 04, 2019

Almost 350 years after Isaac Newton's ground-breaking paper "Theory of Light and Colors (1671)", the world's oldest scientific journal Philosophical Transactions is now once again dedicated to light. The special issue on "Ultrafast Dynamics with X-ray Methods" is aimed at researchers who want to investigate biological, chemical or physical processes and obtain an overview of new developments in light sources and the methods available there. Dynamic processes in materials can be analyzed with high resolution and short pulses at X-ray light sources using ultrafast methods.

Femtoslicing and BESSY VSR

The special issue provides a comprehensive overview of current advances in the generation of ultra-short X-ray pulses by light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FELs), High Harmonic Generation (HHG) laser sources and synchrotron radiation sources. An article in collaboration with Dr. Karsten Holldack, HZB, presents FEls and Laser sources but also classifies storage ring based methods such as "Femtoslicing" and BESSY VSR. These methods combine highly brilliant synchrotron light with a special time structure and thus allow to address unique experimental questions that cannot be answered at other sources. This complements and expands the portfolio of accelerator-based sources.

Ultra fast spectroscopy for photochemistry

An important contribution is dedicated to photochemistry, an area that focuses on processes such as photosynthesis, the dynamics of which are still largely unexplored. Using ultra-fast spectroscopy at FELs, HHG sources or at the synchrotron with BESSY VSR, methods are now available to measure in detail, for example, excitations of metallo-proteins and the subsequent reactions ; such experiments provide data that are indispensable, for example, for understanding photocatalysis of solar fuels. This article was written by Prof. Dr. Philippe Wernet, formerly a senior scientist at the HZB, and now a professor at Uppsala University, Sweden.
-end-


Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie

Related Synchrotron Articles:

3-D-modeling of food residues in 230 million years old fossil feces
Synchrotron scanning can produce high-quality 3-D models of well-preserved food residues from fossil feces.
Lyncean Technologies signs AXT Pty Ltd as representative in Australia and New Zealand
Lyncean Technologies, Inc., manufacturer of the Lyncean Compact Light Source (CLS), today announced the signing of AXT Pty Ltd as their exclusive representative in Australia and New Zealand.
Synchrotron sheds (X-ray) light on carbon chemistry at ocean surfaces
Carbonate, bicarbonate, and carbonic acid emerge when atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolves in the oceans, which is the largest sink for this greenhouse gas.
Kinase discovery sheds new light on several disease processes
New light on a key factor involved in diseases such as Parkinson's disease, gastric cancer and melanoma has been cast through latest University of Otago, New Zealand, research carried out in collaboration with Australian scientists.
New synchrotron powder diffraction facility for long running experiments
Synchrotron beamlines and their instruments are built to harness the photon beam power of synchrotron radiation (SR), which has special properties -- ideally suited to providing detailed and accurate structural information that is difficult to obtain from conventional sources.
More Synchrotron News and Synchrotron Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.